First World War Military Art Prints


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Very few of the British soldiers made it through the barbed wire defences, and even fewer to the German trenches.  By the end of the first day the British losses were 60,000 men.

The Battle of the Somme - At the German Trenches by Jason Askew. (P)
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  Emerging from a smokescreen SMS Baden surges ahead of her sister ship SMS Bayern to resume battle speed in these fleet manoeuvres in the Baltic, during 1917

The Kaisers Ship by Randall Wilson (P)
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 New Zealand's highest scoring ace, with 25 victories to his credit, proved himself to be an extraordinary and resourceful leader.  Whilst on a routine patrol in September 1918, Keith Logan 'Grid' Caldwell's 74 Sqn SE5a was involved in a mid-air collision with another SE5a, the impact breaking one of Caldwell's struts and destroying the aerodynamics of his aircraft, which promptly dropped 1,000 ft and went into a flat spin.  Incredibly, Caldwell climbed from the cockpit of his stricken machine and held the broken strut together with his left hand whilst keeping his right hand on the joystick, somehow steering his wayward fighter out of danger and over friendly territory.  With no hope of a safe landing, the Kiwi jumped clear of the SE5a just a second or so before it impacted with the ground. Astounded British soldiers in a nearby trench saw Caldwell stand, dust himself off and walk casually toward them.  He returned to his unit and continued flying until the end of the war.

The Tenacious Grid Caldwell by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Rittmeister Karl Bolle Commander Jasta 2 early 1918.

Alone in a Winter Sky - Fokker Triplane DR1 by David Pentland. (P)
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 HMS Tiger is shown under full steam.

Battle of the Dogger Bank 1915 by Randall Wilson (P)
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 This aircraft entered service with the RFC in February 1915. Nicknamed the gunbus, it was the first British aircraft to be designed as a fighting machine from the start. The plane was armed with a single .303 inch Lewis machine gun, fired by the observer. It was only a short period of time before it was outclassed by German aircraft carrying synchronised forward firing machine guns.

Vickers Gunbus FB5 by Tim Fisher. (P)
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  Down by the bows, the battered Seydlitz returns to the Jade after being heavily involved in the gun line action at Jutland.

SMS Seydlitz 1916 by Randall Wilson (P)
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 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
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 Renault FT 17 baby tanks of the recently formed US 304th tank brigade commanded by the young Lt. Col George S. Patton Jnr. are employed for the first time during the allied assault on the St Mihiel Salient. Leading the 344th battalion in person Patton and his tanks help the infantry divisions push the enemy back to the Hindenberg line in only 4 days.

Baptism of Fire - St Mihiel Salient, 12th - 15th September 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
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Welcome to the website dedicated to the Historical Military Art Prints of the First World War published by The Military Art Company Cranston Fine Arts. By the worlds leading artists covering many of the great battles of the Great War.

We have bought together the largest range of Military, naval and Aviation art work of the First World War available. At great prices, and many special offers and 2 print pack offers. The more you buy the more you save, many of these superb art prints are only available direct form Cranston Fine Arts or our websites.

 

LATEST WW1 AVIATION ART RELEASES

The practice of shooting down observation balloons was as dangerous as it was essential and none was more successful than Belgium's Adjutant Willy Coppens of the 9eme Escadrille, Aviation Militaire Belge who downed an astonishing 35 balloons, as well as two aircraft during his flying career in WW1.  He is shown here in Hanriot HD.1 No24 destroying a German Drachen balloon in the closing minutes of the day near Houthulst.

Last Kill of the Day by Ivan Berryman.
Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 Godwin von Brumowski's 13th victory against an Italian Macchi seaplane over Grado, in northern Italy.

Lucky 13 by Ivan Berryman.
 Barely 300m above the distinctively meandering Piave River on 17th April 1918, an intense aerial battle took place between Sopwith Camels of 28 Sqn RFC and pilots of Flik 41J of the Austro-Hungarian Air Force near Arcade, north east of Venice.  The Commander of Flik 41J, Godwin von Brumowski, the Austro-Hungarian 'Ace of Aces', dueled with Lieutenant W C Hargrave, flying Camel B6342, a battle in which the distinctive red Albatros D.III (Oef) 153.45, emblazoned with its identifying skull motifs gained the upper hand, sending Lt Hargrave's machine to the ground to claim victory number 31. This 'kill' was shared that day with Oblt Friedrich Navratil, the first of his 10 victories, whose aircraft can be seen in the distance.

Close Combat - The 31st Victory by Ivan Berryman.

 The last Austro-Hungarian offensive on the Italian Front, known as the Battle of the Piave River, started on June 15th 1918 with 57 Austro-Hungarian divisions ranged against 58 Italian, 3 British and 2 French who were entrenched along the whole of the front line from the Asiago Plateau in the Alps, along the Piave river, to the marshes at the eastern end of the Venetian lagoon.  After initial successes in crossing the Piave in numerous places and establishing shallow bridgeheads from Montello to the Adriatic, the Austro-Hungarian offensive was brought to an abrupt halt, not least by a change in the weather that brought torrential rain and flooding of the Piave which, fuelled by the melting snow of the Alps, swept away bridges, pontoons, barges, horses and men. As the Austro-Hungarians attempted to supply their forward lines with men, weapons, ammunition and materials, the Italian artillery, consisting of 5,500 cannons and trench mortars continued to pound them, directed by the Drachen observation balloons of the 11° Sezione which were in place close to the Italian coastline. Flik 41J's top ace Hauptmann Godwin von Brumowski, flying his notorious red Albatros D.III (Oef) 135.209 replete with white skulls emblazoned on the fuselage, was on hand however, sending one of the balloons down in flames near Passerella on the fifth day of the offensive, its observer, probably Tenente M Zanini, making his escape by parachute.  This was Brumowski's 33rd victory of the war and his 34th was to follow just minutes later when he shared in the destruction of an Italian SAML S.2 that was strafing troops on the ground.

Drachen Slayer by Ivan Berryman.
 Scoring a handful of victories in May and June of 1917, Austro-Hungarian ace Godwin von Brumowski added steadily to his ever-increasing score on the Italian Front.  But in August, with the increased Italian activity in the air in preparation for and during the 11th Battle of the Isonzo, he entered a period of extraordinary success, scoring 18 victories between 10th and 28th, most of these being scored in his favorite Hansa Brandenburg D.1 (KD) 28.69 Star-Strutter, depicted here above Plava on the banks of the Isonzo river, sending a Caudron C.IV down in flames on the early evening of the 11th, his second for the day.  Brumowski's aircraft was notable for its camouflaged upper wing surfaces, a swirl pattern in olive greens that he had designed himself and which blended his plane into the green wooded foothills of the Southern Austrian Alps, North of his base at Sesana, outside of Trieste.

Ace of the Isonzo by Ivan Berryman.
 The terrible battles that raged between the Italian and Austro-Hungarian armies on the Piave river in Northern Italy in June 1918 had already claimed many thousands of lives on both sides, but as the Italians drove the Austro-Hungarians back, things were to take a defining turn for the worse, as torrential rain and melting snow caused the river to flood, sweeping away bridges, boats and men alike.  The Italians continued to bombard their retreating enemy and rake them with machine gun fire as they tried to cross.  Italian and Allied aircraft too joined in the ruthless destruction of the beaten Austro-Hungarian forces and soon only one pontoon bridge remained. On 20th June, an Italian SIA.7b attempted to bomb this final lifeline, but its efforts were thwarted by the red Albatros D.III (Oef) of Hauptmann Godwin von Brumowski who immediately downed the intruder to claim his 35th - and final  confirmed victory, despite his own aircraft being hit no less than 37 times. An estimated 60,000 Austro-Hungarian troops are believed to have perished during the retreat across the Piave, surely one of WW1's most tragic episodes.

The Last Victory by Ivan Berryman.
 The most successful fighter ace of the Austro-Hungarian Air Force in World War One, Godwin von Brumowski was to end the war credited with 35 air victories (including 12 shared), plus a further eight unconfirmed.  On 23rd November 1917, flying in company with Frank Linke-Crawford, Oblt Brumowski shared in the destruction of two Italian Nieuport scouts near the mouth of the Piave River, as depicted here, flying Albatros D.III (Oeffag)153.45 of Flik 41J bearing his personalized skull motif and all-red colour scheme applied over the original mottled factory finish. Frank Linke Crawford's Albatros can be seen circling in the distance.

Duel Above the Piave by Ivan Berryman.

LATEST WW1 MILITARY ART RELEASES

Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 The Carnic Alps, Northern Italy, 24th May 1915.  Within the first days of declaring war against Austro-Hungary surprise attacks by Italian Alpini captured the weakly-defended Cima Frugnoni, the Pfannspitze and the Porze.  Basically there were two means of penetrating the Austrian lines: either across the relatively low 1,360 m (4,462 ft) Plöcken Pass or via the 1,636 m (5,367 ft) Kreuzbergsattel pass. The Italians attacked both with such vehemence that the terrible losses made this one of the bloodiest battles in the Alpine war.

The High Passes by David Pentland.
 Passchendaele 1917.  Imperial German Infantry 6th Reserve Division 11th Battalion at the third battle of Ypres.

Storm of Steel by Chris Collingwood.
 Imperial German Infantry March 1915.

Letter From Home - 1915 by Chris Collingwood.

 The 1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers going over the top on July 1st 1916, Battle of the Somme.

The Burning Moment - 1916- The Somme by Chris Collingwood.
 Somewhere in Flanders, 1917.

Trench Pals by Chris Collingwood.
 Assault in the vicinity of Thiepval by the Ulster division-1st July 1916.  The 11th Royal Irish Rifles, moving forward from the A line of trenches, and moving forward to attack the B line of trenches, the attacking infantry are preceded by Bombers - seen carryng grenades in green canvas buckets - who are engaged in throwing grenades in anticipation of the rifle company assault on the enemy trenches; an activity barely changed since the days of Marlborough.  The rifle companies are armed with the Lee Enfield SMLE - a superb rifle, though expensive to make.  The advance is made with bayonets fixed, as trench clearing involved numerous hand to hand confrontations and bayonet fights.  The rifle companies are supported by  two Lewis gun teams per company.  Note that visible in the painting is a man carrying an orange painted steel marker, painted on one side only. The markers are to to indicate to British artillery observers as to the most forward positions taken by the British advance.  Naturally, one does not present the orange side to the enemy!

The Great Folly of 1916 by Jason Askew.
 The 2nd Australian Brigade were brought up to reinforce the British attempt to force the Turkish positions at Achi-baba. this action developed into the second Battle of Krithia.

2nd Australian Brigade fighting in Gully Ravine by Jason Askew.

LATEST WW1 NAVAL ART RELEASES


Untergang der Kanonenbootes 'Jtis' an der chinesischen Kuste.

Kreuzer der Auflarungsgruppe vor Helgoland.

Auf der Kommandobrucke eines Linienschiffes by W Stower.

An Deck eines Torpedobootes.


Jm Gefechtsmars eines Kreuzers by S Stower.

Rekruten Exerzieren mit Handwaffen an Deck eines Panzerschiffes by S Stower.

Hochsee Torpedobootsdivision den Kieler Hafen verlassend.

A Night Attack - Torpedo Boats at Work by Charles Dixon.

This Week's Half Price World War One Offers

 Shown in the colours of Jasta Boelke and carrying Baumers personal red / white /  black flash on the fuselage, Fokker DR.1 204/17 was the aircraft in which he scored many of his 43 victories. Although the Sopwith Triplane had been withdrawn from service, German pilots frequently found their DR.1s being mistakenly attacked by their own flak batteries and, sometimes, by other pilots. For this reason, in march 1918, Baumers aircraft bore additional crosses on the centre of the tailplane and on the lower wings to aid identification. For some reason, his rudder displayed what appeared to be an incomplete border to the national marking. Nicknamed Der Eiserne Adler - The Iron Eagle - Paul Baumer survived the war, but died in a flying accident near Copenhagen whilst testing the Rohrbach Rofix fighter.  He is shown in action having just downed an RE.8 while, above him, Leutnant Otto Lofflers DR.1 190/17 banks into the sun to begin another attack.

Leutnant Paul Baumer by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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Albert Ball in his Nieuport 17 having just shot down a German LVG.  His aircraft, A134, was distinctive in having a bright red spinner.  He was the first Royal Flying Corps pilot to score a hat-trick (3 kills on a single mission) and, in the course of his career, scored another two on his way to his outstanding 44 victories.

Albert Ball by Ivan Berryman. (B)
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 During a patrol on 6th July 1918, Christiansen spotted a British submarine on the surface of the Thames Estuary. He immediately turned and put his Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 floatplane into an attacking dive, raking the submarine C.25 with machine gun fire, killing the captain and five other crewmen. This victory was added to his personal tally, bringing his score to 13 kills by the end of the war, even though the submarine managed to limp back to safety. Christiansen survived the war and went on to work as a pilot for the Dornier company, notably flying the giant Dornier Do.X on its inaugural flight to New York in 1930. He died in 1972, aged 93.

Kapitanleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen by Ivan Berryman.
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  HMS Glorious and HMS Repulse fire opening salvos against the German cruiser Pillau at the Heligoland Bight 17th November 1917.

Engage by Randall Wilson. (P)
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 For so large a machine, production of the Handley Page 0/400 was considerable with over 400 examples being delivered by the time of the Armistice in 1918. Its first missions were carried out during April of that year, operating both during daylight and by night. Here, three machines are being readied for a sortie. As final checks are completed on the nearest aircraft, some last minute engine maintenance is being carried out on a similar machine in the middle distance. The furthest example is being towed, with its vast wings folded, to the dispersal.

Handley Page 0/400s by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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At the outbreak of World War 1, the true potential of the aeroplane as an observation and reconnaissance platform had yet to be fully realised and many types were hurriedly drafted in and put to good use. Whilst the ubiquitous and bird-like Etrich Taube accounted for almost half of Germanys compliment of observation aircraft, the Bavarian army adopted this pusher bipane designed and built by Gustav Otto of Munich. Based on a floatplane of similar configuration and powered by a Rapp engine, this basic machine helped to usher in a new age of aerial reconnaissance. The company of Gustav Otto Flugmuschinen-Werke was later to become AGO Flugzeugwerke GmbH (Actien - Gesellschaft Otto)

Otto Pusher Type M by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 The potential value of aircraft at sea had been proven as early as the Battle of Jutland in 1916 and many experiments were undertaken to provide all significant warships with their own aircraft for spotting and reconnaissance purposes. One solution widely adopted was the fitting of flying-off platforms to the main guns, as demonstrated here, as a Sopwith 1½ strutter is launched from HMS Warspite in 1919.

Sopwith 1 ½ Strutter by Ivan Berryman. (B)
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 HMS Orion leading HMS Conqueror, HMS Monarch, HMS Thunderer, the 2nd Battle Squadron.

2nd Battle Squadron at the Battle of Jutland by Randall Wilson. (P)
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 Godwin von Brumowski's 13th victory against an Italian Macchi seaplane over Grado, in northern Italy.

Lucky 13 by Ivan Berryman. (B)
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 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger.

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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 Von Richthofens Fokker DR 1 Triplane (Serial No 425/17) in company with his wingman in a Fokker D.VII over the fields of the Western Front early in April 1918, peeling off to attack a flight of three British fighters.
In For The Kill by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Set against a spectacular Alpine backdrop, a pair of Aviatik D.1s of Flik 17/D are shown on patrol in March 1918, the nearest aircraft being that of Zugsfuhrer F Korty-Lalitz. When first entering service, the D.1 was praised by its pilots for possessing an excellent climb rate and outstanding performance, but its woeful lack of synchronised armament and poor forward visibility compromised the D.1s ability to meet its enemies on equal terms, these examples being armed only with a single over-wing Schwarzlose M7/16 or M16 machine gun.

F Korty-Lalitz, Aviatik D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
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 Victory No 26 for Josef Mai was a 64 Squadron SE5.A on 5th September 1918, here falling victim to the guns of the aces zebra-striped Fokker D.VII 4598/18 of Jasta 5. By the end of the war, his total had risen to 30 aircraft destroyed, Mai himself collecting a number of decorations, among them the Iron Cross 1st and 2nd class. Surviving the Great War, it is believed that he became a flying instructor for the Luftwaffe during World War II, finally being laid to rest in 1982, aged ninety four.

Leutnant Josef Mai by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 The greatest ace of WW1, Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final guise following the introduction of the Balkenkreuze. This was the only Triplane flown by the Rittmeister that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Rittmeister by Ivan Berryman.
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 Credited with no fewer than 80 victories, Manfred Von Richthofen, The Red Baron, became legendary, not least for the 17 kills scored whilst flying the diminutive Fokker DR1 Triplane.  Contrary to popular belief, however, only one of his aircraft is known to have been painted all red. Serial no. 477/17 is shown here dicing with an SE5.
Seeing Red by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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This is a stunning print of one of the most celebrated paintings of the first world war. A wonderful depiction of human emothion n times of conflict. Matanias work shows a young soldier tenderly cradling the head of his stricken horse, even as shells burst around him, and a comrade urges him onward.  Matania was commissioned in 1916 by the Blue Cross fund to produce a picture illustrating the heroisn of the animals involved in the war. The blue cross fund has been set up by Our Dumb Friends league in 1912, to assists animals during the Balken war, and it later paid £130 for the painting.  This was money well spent as the scene, subtitled An incident on the road to a battery position in Southern Flanders, achieved iconic status. The work was printed in numerous publications thoughout the world, with thw Belgium magazine Le Grande Guerre asserting, below the image Les Anglais ont pour leurs chevaux une grande amiti (The English have a great love for their horses). Over one million horses saw service with the british Army during the First world war.
Goodbye My Old Friend by Matania. (GM)
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 Assault in the vicinity of Thiepval by the Ulster division-1st July 1916.  The 11th Royal Irish Rifles, moving forward from the A line of trenches, and moving forward to attack the B line of trenches, the attacking infantry are preceded by Bombers - seen carryng grenades in green canvas buckets - who are engaged in throwing grenades in anticipation of the rifle company assault on the enemy trenches; an activity barely changed since the days of Marlborough.  The rifle companies are armed with the Lee Enfield SMLE - a superb rifle, though expensive to make.  The advance is made with bayonets fixed, as trench clearing involved numerous hand to hand confrontations and bayonet fights.  The rifle companies are supported by  two Lewis gun teams per company.  Note that visible in the painting is a man carrying an orange painted steel marker, painted on one side only. The markers are to to indicate to British artillery observers as to the most forward positions taken by the British advance.  Naturally, one does not present the orange side to the enemy!

The Great Folly of 1916 by Jason Askew. (GM)
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WW1 CENTENARY - GET FREE AVIATION AND MILITARY PRINTS!

Get these four stunning First World War aviation prints FREE when you purchase any of our special WW1 Centenary packs.  There are almost twenty different prints to choose from that have this very special offer - click the link below to see all of them!

SEE THE WW1 CENTENARY AVIATION PACKS WITH FOUR FREE PRINTS - CLICK HERE

 

 

Get these six classic First World War military art prints FREE when you purchase any of our special WW1 Centenary packs.  There are almost twenty different prints to choose from that have this very special offer - click the link below to see all of them!

SEE THE WW1 CENTENARY MILITARY PACKS WITH SIX FREE PRINTS - CLICK HERE

 

 

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