First World War Military Art Prints


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 Designed the brothers Henri and Maurice Farman, the F.40 embodied many of the features of contemporary designs comprising a crew nacelle with pusher propeller and a tail supported by narrow booms and struts. Forty French squadrons were equipped with the type which first entered service in 1915 but, just one year later, they were being withdrawn as rapid developments in fighter design rendered them obsolete. One such example is shown here having surprised a single-seat Taube observation aircraft, which is spotting above some abandoned trenches near a crashed Albatros C.III. The F.40s prominent position for the gunner / observer was one of its qualities and, it is said, inspired the German AGO company when designing their C.1.

Farman F.40 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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Very few of the British soldiers made it through the barbed wire defences, and even fewer to the German trenches.  By the end of the first day the British losses were 60,000 men.

The Battle of the Somme - At the German Trenches by Jason Askew. (P)
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 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
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 New Zealand's highest scoring ace, with 25 victories to his credit, proved himself to be an extraordinary and resourceful leader.  Whilst on a routine patrol in September 1918, Keith Logan 'Grid' Caldwell's 74 Sqn SE5a was involved in a mid-air collision with another SE5a, the impact breaking one of Caldwell's struts and destroying the aerodynamics of his aircraft, which promptly dropped 1,000 ft and went into a flat spin.  Incredibly, Caldwell climbed from the cockpit of his stricken machine and held the broken strut together with his left hand whilst keeping his right hand on the joystick, somehow steering his wayward fighter out of danger and over friendly territory.  With no hope of a safe landing, the Kiwi jumped clear of the SE5a just a second or so before it impacted with the ground. Astounded British soldiers in a nearby trench saw Caldwell stand, dust himself off and walk casually toward them.  He returned to his unit and continued flying until the end of the war.

The Tenacious Grid Caldwell by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Renault FT 17 baby tanks of the recently formed US 304th tank brigade commanded by the young Lt. Col George S. Patton Jnr. are employed for the first time during the allied assault on the St Mihiel Salient. Leading the 344th battalion in person Patton and his tanks help the infantry divisions push the enemy back to the Hindenberg line in only 4 days.

Baptism of Fire - St Mihiel Salient, 12th - 15th September 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
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At 0620 hours covered by a brief barrage from 1000 guns, the tanks of C and F Battalions in MkIV tanks advanced alongside the men of the British 12th Division against the impregnable German Hindenburg line at Cambrai.  Supported in the air by 4 RFC squadron flying ground attack missions, the general offensive had broken through 3 trench lines and penetrated 5 miles on a 6 mile front by lunchtime.  Although these gains were not exploited and later retaken by a German counter offensive, Cambrai showed the full potential of the tank on the battlefield.
Original Pencil Sketch for Battle of Cambrai, France, 20th November 1917 by David Pentland. (P)
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HM submarine H.28 enters Scapa Flow anchorage, passing the forlorn Battle Cruiser SMS Derfflinger and a group of sunken destroyers H.28 was one of the H class submarines. Launched in March 1918, she was finally scrapped in 1944.

Scapa Flow Graveyard by Robert Barbour (P)
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 Fokker DR.1 Triplane 425/17 of Manfred von Richthofen, accompanied by a Fokker. D.VII wingman, swoops from a high patrol early in 1918. 425/17 was the aircraft in which the Red Baron finally met his end in April of that year, no fewer than 17 of his victories having been scored in his red-painted triplane.

Final Days by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Perhaps the greatest exponent of Fokker's Eindecker series of aircraft, Max Immelmann is credited with 15 aerial victories and was the first fighter pilot ever to win the coveted Pour le Mérite. He was killed on 18th June 1916 during combat with British FE.2B fighters of 25 Sqn.

The First Ace - Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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Welcome to the website dedicated to the Historical Military Art Prints of the First World War published by The Military Art Company Cranston Fine Arts. By the worlds leading artists covering many of the great battles of the Great War.

We have bought together the largest range of Military, naval and Aviation art work of the First World War available. At great prices, and many special offers and 2 print pack offers. The more you buy the more you save, many of these superb art prints are only available direct form Cranston Fine Arts or our websites.

 

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 Arguably the best known of all World War 1 fighter aces, Mannfred von Richthofen, the 'Red Baron', is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final livery following the introduction of the <i>Balkenkreuze</i>, early in 1918. Contrary to popular belief, this was the only Triplane flown by the <i>Rittmeister</i> that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Greatest of Them All - Manfred von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman.
 Perhaps the greatest exponent of Fokker's Eindecker series of aircraft, Max Immelmann is credited with 15 aerial victories and was the first fighter pilot ever to win the coveted Pour le Mérite. He was killed on 18th June 1916 during combat with British FE.2B fighters of 25 Sqn.

The First Ace - Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman.
 The great Werner Voss is depicted in his Fokker F1 103/17 of Jasta 10 in the Summer of 1917. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary airmanship, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down and killed by Lieutenant Rhys Davids' SE5 on the very day that he was due to go on leave. The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss' machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine and his aircraft was not fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.

Into the Sun - Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman.
A single Royal Flying Corps SE5 patrols the clouds above the trenches of the Western Front.

The Lonely Sky by Gerald Coulson.

The practice of shooting down observation balloons was as dangerous as it was essential and none was more successful than Belgium's Adjutant Willy Coppens of the 9eme Escadrille, Aviation Militaire Belge who downed an astonishing 35 balloons, as well as two aircraft during his flying career in WW1.  He is shown here in Hanriot HD.1 No24 destroying a German Drachen balloon in the closing minutes of the day near Houthulst.

Last Kill of the Day by Ivan Berryman.
Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 Godwin von Brumowski's 13th victory against an Italian Macchi seaplane over Grado, in northern Italy.

Lucky 13 by Ivan Berryman.
 Barely 300m above the distinctively meandering Piave River on 17th April 1918, an intense aerial battle took place between Sopwith Camels of 28 Sqn RFC and pilots of Flik 41J of the Austro-Hungarian Air Force near Arcade, north east of Venice.  The Commander of Flik 41J, Godwin von Brumowski, the Austro-Hungarian 'Ace of Aces', dueled with Lieutenant W C Hargrave, flying Camel B6342, a battle in which the distinctive red Albatros D.III (Oef) 153.45, emblazoned with its identifying skull motifs gained the upper hand, sending Lt Hargrave's machine to the ground to claim victory number 31. This 'kill' was shared that day with Oblt Friedrich Navratil, the first of his 10 victories, whose aircraft can be seen in the distance.

Close Combat - The 31st Victory by Ivan Berryman.

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Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 The Carnic Alps, Northern Italy, 24th May 1915.  Within the first days of declaring war against Austro-Hungary surprise attacks by Italian Alpini captured the weakly-defended Cima Frugnoni, the Pfannspitze and the Porze.  Basically there were two means of penetrating the Austrian lines: either across the relatively low 1,360 m (4,462 ft) Plöcken Pass or via the 1,636 m (5,367 ft) Kreuzbergsattel pass. The Italians attacked both with such vehemence that the terrible losses made this one of the bloodiest battles in the Alpine war.

The High Passes by David Pentland.
 Passchendaele 1917.  Imperial German Infantry 6th Reserve Division 11th Battalion at the third battle of Ypres.

Storm of Steel by Chris Collingwood.
 Imperial German Infantry March 1915.

Letter From Home - 1915 by Chris Collingwood.

 The 1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers going over the top on July 1st 1916, Battle of the Somme.

The Burning Moment - 1916- The Somme by Chris Collingwood.
 Somewhere in Flanders, 1917.

Trench Pals by Chris Collingwood.
 Assault in the vicinity of Thiepval by the Ulster division-1st July 1916.  The 11th Royal Irish Rifles, moving forward from the A line of trenches, and moving forward to attack the B line of trenches, the attacking infantry are preceded by Bombers - seen carryng grenades in green canvas buckets - who are engaged in throwing grenades in anticipation of the rifle company assault on the enemy trenches; an activity barely changed since the days of Marlborough.  The rifle companies are armed with the Lee Enfield SMLE - a superb rifle, though expensive to make.  The advance is made with bayonets fixed, as trench clearing involved numerous hand to hand confrontations and bayonet fights.  The rifle companies are supported by  two Lewis gun teams per company.  Note that visible in the painting is a man carrying an orange painted steel marker, painted on one side only. The markers are to to indicate to British artillery observers as to the most forward positions taken by the British advance.  Naturally, one does not present the orange side to the enemy!

The Great Folly of 1916 by Jason Askew.
 The 2nd Australian Brigade were brought up to reinforce the British attempt to force the Turkish positions at Achi-baba. this action developed into the second Battle of Krithia.

2nd Australian Brigade fighting in Gully Ravine by Jason Askew.

LATEST WW1 NAVAL ART RELEASES


Untergang der Kanonenbootes 'Jtis' an der chinesischen Kuste.

Kreuzer der Auflarungsgruppe vor Helgoland.

Auf der Kommandobrucke eines Linienschiffes by W Stower.

An Deck eines Torpedobootes.


Jm Gefechtsmars eines Kreuzers by S Stower.

Rekruten Exerzieren mit Handwaffen an Deck eines Panzerschiffes by S Stower.

Hochsee Torpedobootsdivision den Kieler Hafen verlassend.

A Night Attack - Torpedo Boats at Work by Charles Dixon.

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 A German Albatross D-III sees off a Bristol Fighter among the clouds over the Western Front, early in 1917. The D-III was a massive improvement over the monoplanes of the time, possessing greater manoeuvrability, a higher ceiling and synchronized guns. Many German aces thought this the best fighter of the First World War.

One in the Bag by Ivan Berryman (GS)
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 The Austro-Hungarian Lloyd C.V was a two-seat observation aircraft which was unconventional both in appearance and construction. Its unusually-shaped wings were not fabric covered, but were laminated in plywood for strength and lightness. This innovation, however, caused great problems with maintenance, battle damage repair and structural fatigue caused by moisture building up inside the wing section. Despite its faults, the C.V was a fast and streamlined machine that acquitted itself well during its brief career, 144 of the type being produced by the Lloyd and WKF factories in 1917.

Lloyd C.V by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 On 8th October 1914, war in the air changed forever with what would become the first successful strategic bombing raid on Germany. As bad weather threatened to frustrate their mission, two little Sopwith Tabloids took off in search of the giant Zeppelin sheds at Cologne and Dusseldorf, one piloted by Squadron Commander D A Spenser Grey and the other by Flight Lieutenant Reggie Marix. Grey was beaten by poor visibility and instead chose to bomb the railway station at Cologne whilst Marix located the primary target and bombed it at once from a height of just 600ft. Almost immediately, the mighty LZ.25 that was housed inside began to burn and then blew up spectacularly, the fireball threatening to engulf Marixs Tabloid. Both Marix and Grey were awarded the Distinguished Service Order for their efforts. The age of aerial bombing had arrived.

Flight Lieutenant R L G Marix by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Major Lanoe G Hawkers Bristol Scout C 1611, the No 6 Sqn aircraft in which he shot down two enemy planes on 25th July, 1915, and sufficiently damaged a third enemy aircraft to force it to the ground. He is shown here in combat with an Albatross C.III - soon to fall as one of his victims that day.  Lanoe G Hawker earned the first aerial Victoria Cross (VC) of the war for this action, but was killed in November 1916, after a lengthy battle with the infamous Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen, becoming his 11th victim.

Lanoe G Hawker by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Formidable commander of Jasta Boelcke, Karl Bolle, breaks off the attack on a 73 Sqn Sopwith Camel as its fuel tank begins to ignite - another undeniable victory in a career which saw him take an eventual 36 confirmed kills. The yellow band on the fuselage paid homage to his former unit, flanked by the black and white Prussian stripes Bolles Fokker DR.1 also sported an Oigee telescopic gunsight mounted between the guns. he survived two World Wars and died in Berlin in 1955.

Rittmeister Karl Bolle by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Hauptmann Oswald Boelcke was a shining example of everything that a fighter pilot should be, but his real legacy was his set of rules - Dicta Boelcke - that he devised for air combat, outlining techniques and tactics that became the standard for many generations of fighter pilots to come. He is shown in the aircraft in which he lost his life on 28th October 1916 when his all-black Albatross D.I was involved in a collision with his own wingman. Boelckes final tally was 40 victories.

Oswald Boelcke by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 On the morning of 21st April 1917, coastal airship No C.17 was on a routine patrol captained by Sub Lieutenant  E G O Jackson, when sometime around 8.00am, she was attacked by German seaplanes and shot down. Such was their vulnerability that these huge battlebags were an easy target for marauding enemy scouts, their single Lewis guns achieving little by way of defence. The Hansa Brandenburg W.12, on the other hand, was a nimble and useful aircraft that the Germans put to good use in the coastal defence role.

Hansa Brandenburg W.12 - Attack on the C.17 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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 With his personal emblem of black and white fuselage band adorning his Fokker E.V, 153/18, Richard Wenzl briefly commanded Jasta 6, based at Bernes in August 1918, and claimed a modest 6 victories during his career with JG 1. The Fokker E.V was both fast and manoeuvrable, but a series of engine and structural failures meant that these exciting new machines saw only brief service before being re-worked to emerge as the D.VIII, sadly too late to make any impression on the war. Wenzl is shown here in combat with Sopwith Camels of 203 Sqn, assisted by Fokker D.VIIs, which served alongside the E.Vs of Jasta 6. The D.VII shown is that of Ltn d R Erich Just of Jasta 11, also based at Bernes.

Leutnant d R Richard Wenzl by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Fourteen A7V Sturmpanzerwagen and supporting infantry led the final push towards the strategic allied supply hub of Amiens. The panzers were divided into 3 groups, the first Skopnik with 3 tanks attacked and took Villers Bretoneux. The second group Uihlein of seven tanks struck towards the Bois DAquenne, while the third group Steinhardt comprising Elfriede, Nixe, Siegfried and Schnuck drove towards Cachy. The attack may well have succeeded but for the unexpected intervention of Britsh Mk IV and medium Whippet tanks.

The New War Elephants, Cachy, France 24th April 1918 by David Pentland. (B)
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 Dawn.  British artillery thundered, and the territorial soldiers 15th Scottish division stormed towards the  German trenches defending the  coal mining village of Loos.  The gas cloud that preceded the Highland advance was pendulous and largely stationary due to a distinct lack of wind, and ,upon emerging from the smudgy gas, the highlanders were pelted with  machine gun fire and shrapnel from the defending German batteries.  Not to be denied, the Scots gritted their teeth, and with an officer shouting faster boys! give them hell! the highlanders charged straight at the defenses. The Germans, unnerved by the stubborn courage of their kilted opponents, began to fall back through the village of Loos.  The Camerons and the Black Watch, shouting their battle cry and charging down the main road of the village, then engaged the defending Germans in a series of savage battles for each and every house - hob-nailed boots, rifle butts, and bayonets being wielded with great enthusiasm by the vengeful Scots.  By 8.00am the village was in Scottish hands.

Faster Boys - Give Them Hell! Loos, September 25th 1915 by Jason Askew.
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 The highest scoring allied ace of World War 1, Rene Fonck was born on 27th March 1894 and spent his early military service with the 11th Regiment of Engineers before being sent for flying instruction in the spring of 1915. Almost as soon as he had been assigned to combat duties, he began to score and was posted to Groupe de Combat No12, the famous Storks where a combination of superb airmanship and deadly accurate gunnery ensured that his victory tally continued to grow. By the end of the war, Fonck was credited with a commendable 75 confirmed victories, but it is likely that he may have been responsible for a further possible 69 kills, which would have taken his total score to 144 - 64 more than Manfred von Richthofen, the notorious Red Baron. Capitaine Rene Fonck is shown in one of his Spad S.XIIIs chasing down a DFW C-Type.

Capitaine Rene Fonck by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
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 Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders. (RM)
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 The Mark IV Tank of Lt. F. MItchell MC, 1st battalion Tank Corps engages A7V tanks at Villers-Bretonneux, 24th April 1918.

The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands (GS)
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 Pioneers of wooden fuselages, LFG Roland honed their considerable skills in fighter design throughout World War 1, culminating in the excellent D.VI as depicted here in the capable hands of Vfw Emil Schape as he and his Jasta 33 wingman bear down on a lone SE.5 in September 1918. Schape went on to score an impressive 18 victories, all but one of them with Jasta 33. Only 150 examples of the Roland D.VI found their way to the Jastas, the type being overshadowed by the Fokker D.VII and Pfalz D.XII, but its beautifully shaped planked fuselage made it a robust opponent that was capable of absorbing all the rigours of front line service.

Vfw Emil Schape by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day.

Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman. (XX)
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 The fledgling air forces of WW I had no problem finding volunteers for a life promising adventure, romance, and a chance for immortality. The glamorized version of life as a WW I aviator, while not far off the mark for national heroes like Max Immelmann, Oswold Boelcke, Charles Nungesser, Manfred von Richtofen, Rene Fonck and Billy Bishop, was only a pipe dream for most pilots. Honors accrued only to those with large victory totals, and impressive wins, and as the War dragged on, the chivalrous adventure became more and more unglamorous. In fact the Allied command discouraged the use of parachutes - believing it the pilots duty to stay with his aircraft. Many pilots did not return home. The average expected lifespan of a new combat pilot during WW I was about 5 weeks. The French suffered a 77 percent loss ratio during the War, and the loss ratios for many British squadrons exceeded 90% early in the War. The Great War had started only about ten years after the Wright Brothers first flight and the aircraft flown at the beginning of the War were very fragile and not yet truly suitable for combat. Flying accidents and malfunctions took an enormous toll on both equipment and pilots. Despite the frailties of the aircraft and the relative inexperience of the military as to their use in combat roles,  an Italian staff officer named Giulio Douhet,  way back in 1909 had laid down the fundamental strategies of future air combat. In order to conquer the air, it is necessary to deprive the enemy of all means of flying, by striking them in the air, at his bases of operation, or at his production centers. There were many lesser known heroes of WW I, and one of the little known American aces of WW I was 1st Lt. William P. Erwin of the 1st Aero Squadron USAS. Erwin flew the Salmson 2A2 depicted in Stan Stokes painting. Erwin would attain eight aerial victories in this type of aircraft, making him the leading ace in this type of aircraft. Erwin was born in Amarillo, Texas, but grew up in Chicago. He volunteered for pilot training at the beginning of Americas entry into the War. He was accepted and ultimately was sent to France Flying with Lt. D.H. Dahringer, the first in a succession of observers, he downed his first German aircraft in September 1917. He shot down a Rumpler two-seater a couple of weeks later, and in early October during a dawn patrol he claimed his third victory. He bagged two German 2-seaters on a late afternoon mission to become an ace. On October 15 he bagged an unspecified German aircraft and three days later he downed a Fokker D VII. He completed his tally with the downing of another 2-seater on October 22. Erwin earned the Distinguished Service Cross and the French Croix de Guerre. He continued to be involved with aviation following the War. He entered the Dole Air Race from Oakland to Hawaii, but his aircraft was lost over the Pacific.
Dawn Patrol by Stan Stokes. (B)
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 The Jasta was part of the Flying Circus, and one of the first units to receive and be fully equipped with the new Pfaltz DIII aircraft. In their capable hands this elegant aircraft proved an effective weapon.

Jasta 10, Northern France Early September 1917 by David Pentland. (B)
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Get these four stunning First World War aviation prints FREE when you purchase any of our special WW1 Centenary packs.  There are almost twenty different prints to choose from that have this very special offer - click the link below to see all of them!

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Get these six classic First World War military art prints FREE when you purchase any of our special WW1 Centenary packs.  There are almost twenty different prints to choose from that have this very special offer - click the link below to see all of them!

SEE THE WW1 CENTENARY MILITARY PACKS WITH SIX FREE PRINTS - CLICK HERE

 

 

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