First World War Military Art Prints


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SMS Derfflinger at anchor at Kiel, 1918.  Astern is SMS Hindenburg.

SMS Derfflinger By Randall Wilson (P)
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  HMS Agincourt is shown alongside HMS Erin with ships of the 1st Battle squadron of the Grand Fleet, on the eve of the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Agincourt by Randall Wilson. (P)
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 The highest scoring allied ace of World War 1, Rene Fonck was born on 27th March 1894 and spent his early military service with the 11th Regiment of Engineers before being sent for flying instruction in the spring of 1915. Almost as soon as he had been assigned to combat duties, he began to score and was posted to Groupe de Combat No12, the famous Storks where a combination of superb airmanship and deadly accurate gunnery ensured that his victory tally continued to grow. By the end of the war, Fonck was credited with a commendable 75 confirmed victories, but it is likely that he may have been responsible for a further possible 69 kills, which would have taken his total score to 144 - 64 more than Manfred von Richthofen, the notorious Red Baron. Capitaine Rene Fonck is shown in one of his Spad S.XIIIs chasing down a DFW C-Type.

Capitaine Rene Fonck by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 The great Werner Voss is depicted in his Fokker F1 103/17 of Jasta 10 in the Summer of 1917. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary airmanship, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down and killed by Lieutenant Rhys Davids' SE5 on the very day that he was due to go on leave. The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss' machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine and his aircraft was not fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.

Into the Sun - Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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The British Grand Fleet had been virtually unopposed for nearly a century but now there was a challenge to the throne: the German Navy. Although smaller, it had caught up fast and by the time of Jutland, had some telling advantages over the British Fleet. the plan for the battle was to lure the British Grand Fleet into a lethal trap in German waters. In the event although desperately fought by both sides, the battle was a stale mate. the confused conflict was hampered on both sides by bad luck, bad weather and poor communications. at the end of the battle, the Royal navy had suffered higher losses in men and ships, but the German fleet never ventured out of harbour to seek battle again.

The Battle of Jutland, HMS Royal Oak by Anthony Saunders (P)
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 Arguably the best known of all World War 1 fighter aces, Mannfred von Richthofen, the 'Red Baron', is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final livery following the introduction of the <i>Balkenkreuze</i>, early in 1918. Contrary to popular belief, this was the only Triplane flown by the <i>Rittmeister</i> that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Greatest of Them All - Manfred von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 HMS Tiger is shown under full steam.

Battle of the Dogger Bank 1915 by Randall Wilson (P)
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 A German machine gun team defend against the British 3rd Corps attack on the high ground north of the Somme.  This was to be the start of the final Allied offensive of the war.

The Machine Guns - Battle of Amiens, France, 8th August 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
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 The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex.

Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £2300.00
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Welcome to the website dedicated to the Historical Military Art Prints of the First World War published by The Military Art Company Cranston Fine Arts. By the worlds leading artists covering many of the great battles of the Great War.

We have bought together the largest range of Military, naval and Aviation art work of the First World War available. At great prices, and many special offers and 2 print pack offers. The more you buy the more you save, many of these superb art prints are only available direct form Cranston Fine Arts or our websites.

 

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 Arguably the best known of all World War 1 fighter aces, Mannfred von Richthofen, the 'Red Baron', is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final livery following the introduction of the <i>Balkenkreuze</i>, early in 1918. Contrary to popular belief, this was the only Triplane flown by the <i>Rittmeister</i> that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Greatest of Them All - Manfred von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman.
 Perhaps the greatest exponent of Fokker's Eindecker series of aircraft, Max Immelmann is credited with 15 aerial victories and was the first fighter pilot ever to win the coveted Pour le Mérite. He was killed on 18th June 1916 during combat with British FE.2B fighters of 25 Sqn.

The First Ace - Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman.
 The great Werner Voss is depicted in his Fokker F1 103/17 of Jasta 10 in the Summer of 1917. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary airmanship, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down and killed by Lieutenant Rhys Davids' SE5 on the very day that he was due to go on leave. The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss' machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine and his aircraft was not fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.

Into the Sun - Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman.
A single Royal Flying Corps SE5 patrols the clouds above the trenches of the Western Front.

The Lonely Sky by Gerald Coulson.

The practice of shooting down observation balloons was as dangerous as it was essential and none was more successful than Belgium's Adjutant Willy Coppens of the 9eme Escadrille, Aviation Militaire Belge who downed an astonishing 35 balloons, as well as two aircraft during his flying career in WW1.  He is shown here in Hanriot HD.1 No24 destroying a German Drachen balloon in the closing minutes of the day near Houthulst.

Last Kill of the Day by Ivan Berryman.
Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 Godwin von Brumowski's 13th victory against an Italian Macchi seaplane over Grado, in northern Italy.

Lucky 13 by Ivan Berryman.
 Barely 300m above the distinctively meandering Piave River on 17th April 1918, an intense aerial battle took place between Sopwith Camels of 28 Sqn RFC and pilots of Flik 41J of the Austro-Hungarian Air Force near Arcade, north east of Venice.  The Commander of Flik 41J, Godwin von Brumowski, the Austro-Hungarian 'Ace of Aces', dueled with Lieutenant W C Hargrave, flying Camel B6342, a battle in which the distinctive red Albatros D.III (Oef) 153.45, emblazoned with its identifying skull motifs gained the upper hand, sending Lt Hargrave's machine to the ground to claim victory number 31. This 'kill' was shared that day with Oblt Friedrich Navratil, the first of his 10 victories, whose aircraft can be seen in the distance.

Close Combat - The 31st Victory by Ivan Berryman.

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Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 The Carnic Alps, Northern Italy, 24th May 1915.  Within the first days of declaring war against Austro-Hungary surprise attacks by Italian Alpini captured the weakly-defended Cima Frugnoni, the Pfannspitze and the Porze.  Basically there were two means of penetrating the Austrian lines: either across the relatively low 1,360 m (4,462 ft) Plöcken Pass or via the 1,636 m (5,367 ft) Kreuzbergsattel pass. The Italians attacked both with such vehemence that the terrible losses made this one of the bloodiest battles in the Alpine war.

The High Passes by David Pentland.
 Passchendaele 1917.  Imperial German Infantry 6th Reserve Division 11th Battalion at the third battle of Ypres.

Storm of Steel by Chris Collingwood.
 Imperial German Infantry March 1915.

Letter From Home - 1915 by Chris Collingwood.

 The 1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers going over the top on July 1st 1916, Battle of the Somme.

The Burning Moment - 1916- The Somme by Chris Collingwood.
 Somewhere in Flanders, 1917.

Trench Pals by Chris Collingwood.
 Assault in the vicinity of Thiepval by the Ulster division-1st July 1916.  The 11th Royal Irish Rifles, moving forward from the A line of trenches, and moving forward to attack the B line of trenches, the attacking infantry are preceded by Bombers - seen carryng grenades in green canvas buckets - who are engaged in throwing grenades in anticipation of the rifle company assault on the enemy trenches; an activity barely changed since the days of Marlborough.  The rifle companies are armed with the Lee Enfield SMLE - a superb rifle, though expensive to make.  The advance is made with bayonets fixed, as trench clearing involved numerous hand to hand confrontations and bayonet fights.  The rifle companies are supported by  two Lewis gun teams per company.  Note that visible in the painting is a man carrying an orange painted steel marker, painted on one side only. The markers are to to indicate to British artillery observers as to the most forward positions taken by the British advance.  Naturally, one does not present the orange side to the enemy!

The Great Folly of 1916 by Jason Askew.
 The 2nd Australian Brigade were brought up to reinforce the British attempt to force the Turkish positions at Achi-baba. this action developed into the second Battle of Krithia.

2nd Australian Brigade fighting in Gully Ravine by Jason Askew.

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Untergang der Kanonenbootes 'Jtis' an der chinesischen Kuste.

Kreuzer der Auflarungsgruppe vor Helgoland.

Auf der Kommandobrucke eines Linienschiffes by W Stower.

An Deck eines Torpedobootes.


Jm Gefechtsmars eines Kreuzers by S Stower.

Rekruten Exerzieren mit Handwaffen an Deck eines Panzerschiffes by S Stower.

Hochsee Torpedobootsdivision den Kieler Hafen verlassend.

A Night Attack - Torpedo Boats at Work by Charles Dixon.

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 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day.

Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 The 29th Division go over the top to the sound of the officers whistle to attack Beaumont Hamel during the battle of the Somme.  The regiments of the 29th Division are the Middlesex Regiment, Lancashire Fusiliers, Dublin Fusiliers, Royal Fusiliers and the Newfoundland Regiment.

Over the Top by Jason Askew. (GS)
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 The Mark IV Tank of Lt. F. MItchell MC, 1st battalion Tank Corps engages A7V tanks at Villers-Bretonneux, 24th April 1918.

The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands. (GL)
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 During a patrol on 6th July 1918, Christiansen spotted a British submarine on the surface of the Thames Estuary. He immediately turned and put his Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 floatplane into an attacking dive, raking the submarine C.25 with machine gun fire, killing the captain and five other crewmen. This victory was added to his personal tally, bringing his score to 13 kills by the end of the war, even though the submarine managed to limp back to safety. Christiansen survived the war and went on to work as a pilot for the Dornier company, notably flying the giant Dornier Do.X on its inaugural flight to New York in 1930. He died in 1972, aged 93.

Kapitanleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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 In response to a requirement for a seaplane fighter scout, Albatros developed the elegant W.4, a direct descendent of their successful D.1, incorporating many common parts with its land-based relative. About 120 of the type were constructed, many employed in the defence of important naval bases scattered along the coast of the North Sea. A small number of W.4s however fell into the hands of the Soviet Red Army in 1918 and were pressed into service on the Black Sea, based at Sevastopol, as depicted here.

Albatros W.4 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Flying Sopwith Snipe E8102 on 27th October 1918, Major William Barker encountered a flight of fifteen Fokker D.VIIs and decided to take them on single handed. Having downed one enemy aircraft, Barker was wounded in his left thigh and momentarily fainted. Coming to, he found another D.VII ahead of him and immediately resumed the battle. Another bullet now tore into his right leg and another shattered his left elbow. Despite his terrible injuries, Barker shot down three D.VIIs and drove the others off before crash landing his bullet-riddled Snipe in friendly territory. He survived the crash and was awarded the VC for his gallantry on this epic flight.

Major William Barker VC, DSO - Nearly an Ace in a Day by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 HMS Glorious and HMS Repulse fire opening salvos against the German cruiser Pillau at the Heligoland Bight 17th November 1917.

Engage by Randall Wilson. (GS)
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 Formidable commander of Jasta Boelcke, Karl Bolle, breaks off the attack on a 73 Sqn Sopwith Camel as its fuel tank begins to ignite - another undeniable victory in a career which saw him take an eventual 36 confirmed kills. The yellow band on the fuselage paid homage to his former unit, flanked by the black and white Prussian stripes Bolles Fokker DR.1 also sported an Oigee telescopic gunsight mounted between the guns. he survived two World Wars and died in Berlin in 1955.

Rittmeister Karl Bolle by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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 Australian by birth and serving with the New Zealand army in the middle east at the outbreak of World War 1, Arthur Coningham joined the RFC in 1917 and was posted to 32 Squadron, flying DH.2s, as depicted here. It was in such a machine that Coningham scored the first of his 14 victories, sending down a German two seater over Ervillers. He survived the war and was made AOC Desert Air Force in 1941 before taking command of 2nd Tactical Air Force until the Second World War's end whereupon he became Air Marshal and was awarded a knighthood. He died in January 1948.

Major Arthur Coningham by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 HMS Orion leading HMS Conqueror, HMS Monarch, HMS Thunderer, the 2nd Battle Squadron.

2nd Battle Squadron at the Battle of Jutland by Randall Wilson. (AP)
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 On 31st October 1917, 800 men of the Australian Light Horse Brigade charged entrenched Turko-German defences at Beersheba, Palestine. It was an 11th hour attempt to capture vital water wells and save the attacking allied forces from disaster. Under heavy fire from artillery, aircraft, machine gun and rifle fire and against great odds, they successfully charged into history, their losses were 31 dead, 36 wounded and 70 of their beloved horses died.

The Last Great Cavalry Charge by Lambert.
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 Towards the end of the second battle of Cambrai, British Mark IV tanks of 12th Battalion confronted German captured Mark IVs. The ensuing battle was chaotic, emerging from smoke the Germans were initially mistaken as part of C Company, but at 50 meters both sides recovered from their surprise and opened fire simultaneously. The lead British tank L16 commanded by Captain Rowe was immediately knocked out, who escaped with his men to L19 just in time to see it destroyed, along with L12. The remaining tank L8 had broken down some distance back taking no part in the battle, although its commander Lieutenant Martel managed to use a captured 77mm artillery piece to finally halt the German tank.

Unexpected encounter at Niergnies, France, 8th October 1918 by David Pentland. (APB)
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 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day.

Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman.
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 Scoring a handful of victories in May and June of 1917, Austro-Hungarian ace Godwin von Brumowski added steadily to his ever-increasing score on the Italian Front.  But in August, with the increased Italian activity in the air in preparation for and during the 11th Battle of the Isonzo, he entered a period of extraordinary success, scoring 18 victories between 10th and 28th, most of these being scored in his favorite Hansa Brandenburg D.1 (KD) 28.69 Star-Strutter, depicted here above Plava on the banks of the Isonzo river, sending a Caudron C.IV down in flames on the early evening of the 11th, his second for the day.  Brumowski's aircraft was notable for its camouflaged upper wing surfaces, a swirl pattern in olive greens that he had designed himself and which blended his plane into the green wooded foothills of the Southern Austrian Alps, North of his base at Sesana, outside of Trieste.

Ace of the Isonzo by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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 During a patrol on 6th July 1918, Christiansen spotted a British submarine on the surface of the Thames Estuary. He immediately turned and put his Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 floatplane into an attacking dive, raking the submarine C.25 with machine gun fire, killing the captain and five other crewmen. This victory was added to his personal tally, bringing his score to 13 kills by the end of the war, even though the submarine managed to limp back to safety. Christiansen survived the war and went on to work as a pilot for the Dornier company, notably flying the giant Dornier Do.X on its inaugural flight to New York in 1930. He died in 1972, aged 93.

Kapitanleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen by Ivan Berryman.
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 With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes.  In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284.

Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
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 On 8th October 1914, war in the air changed forever with what would become the first successful strategic bombing raid on Germany. As bad weather threatened to frustrate their mission, two little Sopwith Tabloids took off in search of the giant Zeppelin sheds at Cologne and Dusseldorf, one piloted by Squadron Commander D A Spenser Grey and the other by Flight Lieutenant Reggie Marix. Grey was beaten by poor visibility and instead chose to bomb the railway station at Cologne whilst Marix located the primary target and bombed it at once from a height of just 600ft. Almost immediately, the mighty LZ.25 that was housed inside began to burn and then blew up spectacularly, the fireball threatening to engulf Marixs Tabloid. Both Marix and Grey were awarded the Distinguished Service Order for their efforts. The age of aerial bombing had arrived.

Flight Lieutenant R L G Marix by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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Get these six classic First World War military art prints FREE when you purchase any of our special WW1 Centenary packs.  There are almost twenty different prints to choose from that have this very special offer - click the link below to see all of them!

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