First World War Military Art Prints


Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985



Aircraft
Search
Ship
Search
Battle
Search
Artist
Search
SPECIAL OFFERS
Product Search         
(Exact match search - please check our other menus above first)

Special Offer
Originals

 With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes.  In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284.

Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 2000.00
 St. Charmond Assault tanks of the French 10th Heavy Tank battalion move through Villers-Cotterets forest in preparation for the 10th Army counterattack on the German Soissons-Rheims salient.

A Saint goes to War - The Second Marne Offensive, France 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - 1600.00
DHM1856P. The Ludendorff Offensive, Spring 1918 by Jason Askew.

The Ludendorff Offensive, Spring 1918 by Jason Askew. (P)
Save 3000! - 2200.00
Action at Nery, 1st September 1914. During the fighting retreat from Mons, battery L of the Royal horse artillery bivouacked by a small town of Nery. Their temporary halt was interrupted during the early morning cavalry patrol warning of the imminent arrival of a large German force of cavalry, infantry and artillery. almost immediately German shells began bursting amongst the battery, accompanied by a rifle and machine gun fire. 3 guns were knocked out before they could be brought into action and two more were disabled soon afterwards, while the British gunners sustained heavy casualties. the remaining no. 6 gun with a scratch crew managed to maintain a steady fire for some two hours inflicting heavy casualties on the Germans until reinforcements arrived, driving off the surviving German unties. Three Victoria crosses (one posthumously) and two French medaille militaire were awarded and two NCOs were commissioned after the action.

Nery by Brian Palmer. (P)
Save 2000! - 1400.00
  Down by the bows, the battered Seydlitz returns to the Jade after being heavily involved in the gun line action at Jutland.

SMS Seydlitz 1916 by Randall Wilson (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00
 Shown in the colours of Jasta Boelke and carrying Baumers personal red / white /  black flash on the fuselage, Fokker DR.1 204/17 was the aircraft in which he scored many of his 43 victories. Although the Sopwith Triplane had been withdrawn from service, German pilots frequently found their DR.1s being mistakenly attacked by their own flak batteries and, sometimes, by other pilots. For this reason, in march 1918, Baumers aircraft bore additional crosses on the centre of the tailplane and on the lower wings to aid identification. For some reason, his rudder displayed what appeared to be an incomplete border to the national marking. Nicknamed Der Eiserne Adler - The Iron Eagle - Paul Baumer survived the war, but died in a flying accident near Copenhagen whilst testing the Rohrbach Rofix fighter.  He is shown in action having just downed an RE.8 while, above him, Leutnant Otto Lofflers DR.1 190/17 banks into the sun to begin another attack.

Leutnant Paul Baumer by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00
 At the outbreak of World War 1, AGO Flugzeugwerke GmbH had not endeared itself to the architects of the German war machine due to the flimsiness of some of its designs, coupled with poor workmanship. When the C.1 first appeared in 1915, it attracted little interest and yet went on to prove itself to be a robust and useful aircraft, its pusher design dispensing with the now traditional open framework to support the tail in favour of twin streamlined tailbooms. The observer / gunner in the nose enjoyed an unrivalled field of view, although the engines position immediately behind the pilot was always a concern in the event of a crash. This aircraft, LF181, transferred from the Fliegertrouppe to the navy in 1915 and was based at Nieuwmunster, shown here in an exchange with an FE.2b in the skies over Belgium.

AGO C.1 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00
 Set against a spectacular Alpine backdrop, a pair of Aviatik D.1s of Flik 17/D are shown on patrol in March 1918, the nearest aircraft being that of Zugsfuhrer F Korty-Lalitz. When first entering service, the D.1 was praised by its pilots for possessing an excellent climb rate and outstanding performance, but its woeful lack of synchronised armament and poor forward visibility compromised the D.1s ability to meet its enemies on equal terms, these examples being armed only with a single over-wing Schwarzlose M7/16 or M16 machine gun.

F Korty-Lalitz, Aviatik D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 2000.00
 The highest scoring allied ace of World War 1, Rene Fonck was born on 27th March 1894 and spent his early military service with the 11th Regiment of Engineers before being sent for flying instruction in the spring of 1915. Almost as soon as he had been assigned to combat duties, he began to score and was posted to Groupe de Combat No12, the famous Storks where a combination of superb airmanship and deadly accurate gunnery ensured that his victory tally continued to grow. By the end of the war, Fonck was credited with a commendable 75 confirmed victories, but it is likely that he may have been responsible for a further possible 69 kills, which would have taken his total score to 144 - 64 more than Manfred von Richthofen, the notorious Red Baron. Capitaine Rene Fonck is shown in one of his Spad S.XIIIs chasing down a DFW C-Type.

Capitaine Rene Fonck by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 1900.00
FEATURED WW1 ARTISTS

Chris Collingwood

 


Randall Wilson

 


Nicolas Trudgian

Welcome to the website dedicated to the Historical Military Art Prints of the First World War published by The Military Art Company Cranston Fine Arts. By the worlds leading artists covering many of the great battles of the Great War.

We have bought together the largest range of Military, naval and Aviation art work of the First World War available. At great prices, and many special offers and 2 print pack offers. The more you buy the more you save, many of these superb art prints are only available direct form Cranston Fine Arts or our websites.

 

LATEST WW1 AVIATION ART RELEASES

The practice of shooting down observation balloons was as dangerous as it was essential and none was more successful than Belgium's Adjutant Willy Coppens of the 9eme Escadrille, Aviation Militaire Belge who downed an astonishing 35 balloons, as well as two aircraft during his flying career in WW1.  He is shown here in Hanriot HD.1 No24 destroying a German Drachen balloon in the closing minutes of the day near Houthulst.

Last Kill of the Day by Ivan Berryman.
Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 Godwin von Brumowski's 13th victory against an Italian Macchi seaplane over Grado, in northern Italy.

Lucky 13 by Ivan Berryman.
 Barely 300m above the distinctively meandering Piave River on 17th April 1918, an intense aerial battle took place between Sopwith Camels of 28 Sqn RFC and pilots of Flik 41J of the Austro-Hungarian Air Force near Arcade, north east of Venice.  The Commander of Flik 41J, Godwin von Brumowski, the Austro-Hungarian 'Ace of Aces', dueled with Lieutenant W C Hargrave, flying Camel B6342, a battle in which the distinctive red Albatros D.III (Oef) 153.45, emblazoned with its identifying skull motifs gained the upper hand, sending Lt Hargrave's machine to the ground to claim victory number 31. This 'kill' was shared that day with Oblt Friedrich Navratil, the first of his 10 victories, whose aircraft can be seen in the distance.

Close Combat - The 31st Victory by Ivan Berryman.

 The last Austro-Hungarian offensive on the Italian Front, known as the Battle of the Piave River, started on June 15th 1918 with 57 Austro-Hungarian divisions ranged against 58 Italian, 3 British and 2 French who were entrenched along the whole of the front line from the Asiago Plateau in the Alps, along the Piave river, to the marshes at the eastern end of the Venetian lagoon.  After initial successes in crossing the Piave in numerous places and establishing shallow bridgeheads from Montello to the Adriatic, the Austro-Hungarian offensive was brought to an abrupt halt, not least by a change in the weather that brought torrential rain and flooding of the Piave which, fuelled by the melting snow of the Alps, swept away bridges, pontoons, barges, horses and men. As the Austro-Hungarians attempted to supply their forward lines with men, weapons, ammunition and materials, the Italian artillery, consisting of 5,500 cannons and trench mortars continued to pound them, directed by the Drachen observation balloons of the 11° Sezione which were in place close to the Italian coastline. Flik 41J's top ace Hauptmann Godwin von Brumowski, flying his notorious red Albatros D.III (Oef) 135.209 replete with white skulls emblazoned on the fuselage, was on hand however, sending one of the balloons down in flames near Passerella on the fifth day of the offensive, its observer, probably Tenente M Zanini, making his escape by parachute.  This was Brumowski's 33rd victory of the war and his 34th was to follow just minutes later when he shared in the destruction of an Italian SAML S.2 that was strafing troops on the ground.

Drachen Slayer by Ivan Berryman.
 Scoring a handful of victories in May and June of 1917, Austro-Hungarian ace Godwin von Brumowski added steadily to his ever-increasing score on the Italian Front.  But in August, with the increased Italian activity in the air in preparation for and during the 11th Battle of the Isonzo, he entered a period of extraordinary success, scoring 18 victories between 10th and 28th, most of these being scored in his favorite Hansa Brandenburg D.1 (KD) 28.69 Star-Strutter, depicted here above Plava on the banks of the Isonzo river, sending a Caudron C.IV down in flames on the early evening of the 11th, his second for the day.  Brumowski's aircraft was notable for its camouflaged upper wing surfaces, a swirl pattern in olive greens that he had designed himself and which blended his plane into the green wooded foothills of the Southern Austrian Alps, North of his base at Sesana, outside of Trieste.

Ace of the Isonzo by Ivan Berryman.
 The terrible battles that raged between the Italian and Austro-Hungarian armies on the Piave river in Northern Italy in June 1918 had already claimed many thousands of lives on both sides, but as the Italians drove the Austro-Hungarians back, things were to take a defining turn for the worse, as torrential rain and melting snow caused the river to flood, sweeping away bridges, boats and men alike.  The Italians continued to bombard their retreating enemy and rake them with machine gun fire as they tried to cross.  Italian and Allied aircraft too joined in the ruthless destruction of the beaten Austro-Hungarian forces and soon only one pontoon bridge remained. On 20th June, an Italian SIA.7b attempted to bomb this final lifeline, but its efforts were thwarted by the red Albatros D.III (Oef) of Hauptmann Godwin von Brumowski who immediately downed the intruder to claim his 35th - and final  confirmed victory, despite his own aircraft being hit no less than 37 times. An estimated 60,000 Austro-Hungarian troops are believed to have perished during the retreat across the Piave, surely one of WW1's most tragic episodes.

The Last Victory by Ivan Berryman.
 The most successful fighter ace of the Austro-Hungarian Air Force in World War One, Godwin von Brumowski was to end the war credited with 35 air victories (including 12 shared), plus a further eight unconfirmed.  On 23rd November 1917, flying in company with Frank Linke-Crawford, Oblt Brumowski shared in the destruction of two Italian Nieuport scouts near the mouth of the Piave River, as depicted here, flying Albatros D.III (Oeffag)153.45 of Flik 41J bearing his personalized skull motif and all-red colour scheme applied over the original mottled factory finish. Frank Linke Crawford's Albatros can be seen circling in the distance.

Duel Above the Piave by Ivan Berryman.

LATEST WW1 MILITARY ART RELEASES

Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 The Carnic Alps, Northern Italy, 24th May 1915.  Within the first days of declaring war against Austro-Hungary surprise attacks by Italian Alpini captured the weakly-defended Cima Frugnoni, the Pfannspitze and the Porze.  Basically there were two means of penetrating the Austrian lines: either across the relatively low 1,360 m (4,462 ft) Plöcken Pass or via the 1,636 m (5,367 ft) Kreuzbergsattel pass. The Italians attacked both with such vehemence that the terrible losses made this one of the bloodiest battles in the Alpine war.

The High Passes by David Pentland.
 Passchendaele 1917.  Imperial German Infantry 6th Reserve Division 11th Battalion at the third battle of Ypres.

Storm of Steel by Chris Collingwood.
 Imperial German Infantry March 1915.

Letter From Home - 1915 by Chris Collingwood.

 The 1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers going over the top on July 1st 1916, Battle of the Somme.

The Burning Moment - 1916- The Somme by Chris Collingwood.
 Somewhere in Flanders, 1917.

Trench Pals by Chris Collingwood.
 Assault in the vicinity of Thiepval by the Ulster division-1st July 1916.  The 11th Royal Irish Rifles, moving forward from the A line of trenches, and moving forward to attack the B line of trenches, the attacking infantry are preceded by Bombers - seen carryng grenades in green canvas buckets - who are engaged in throwing grenades in anticipation of the rifle company assault on the enemy trenches; an activity barely changed since the days of Marlborough.  The rifle companies are armed with the Lee Enfield SMLE - a superb rifle, though expensive to make.  The advance is made with bayonets fixed, as trench clearing involved numerous hand to hand confrontations and bayonet fights.  The rifle companies are supported by  two Lewis gun teams per company.  Note that visible in the painting is a man carrying an orange painted steel marker, painted on one side only. The markers are to to indicate to British artillery observers as to the most forward positions taken by the British advance.  Naturally, one does not present the orange side to the enemy!

The Great Folly of 1916 by Jason Askew.
 The 2nd Australian Brigade were brought up to reinforce the British attempt to force the Turkish positions at Achi-baba. this action developed into the second Battle of Krithia.

2nd Australian Brigade fighting in Gully Ravine by Jason Askew.

LATEST WW1 NAVAL ART RELEASES


Untergang der Kanonenbootes 'Jtis' an der chinesischen Kuste.

Kreuzer der Auflarungsgruppe vor Helgoland.

Auf der Kommandobrucke eines Linienschiffes by W Stower.

An Deck eines Torpedobootes.


Jm Gefechtsmars eines Kreuzers by S Stower.

Rekruten Exerzieren mit Handwaffen an Deck eines Panzerschiffes by S Stower.

Hochsee Torpedobootsdivision den Kieler Hafen verlassend.

A Night Attack - Torpedo Boats at Work by Charles Dixon.

This Week's Half Price World War One Offers

 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.

Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 At the outbreak of World War 1, the true potential of the aeroplane as an observation and reconnaissance platform had yet to be fully realised and many types were hurriedly drafted in and put to good use. Whilst the ubiquitous and bird-like Etrich Taube accounted for almost half of Germanys compliment of observation aircraft, the Bavarian army adopted this pusher bipane designed and built by Gustav Otto of Munich. Based on a floatplane of similar configuration and powered by a Rapp engine, this basic machine helped to usher in a new age of aerial reconnaissance. The company of Gustav Otto Flugmuschinen-Werke was later to become AGO Flugzeugwerke GmbH (Actien - Gesellschaft Otto)

Otto Pusher Type M by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - 140.00
  Down by the bows, the battered Seydlitz returns to the Jade after being heavily involved in the gun line action at Jutland.

SMS Seydlitz 1916 by Randall Wilson (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 Godwin von Brumowski's 13th victory against an Italian Macchi seaplane over Grado, in northern Italy.

Lucky 13 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
B114.  HMS Carmania sinking the German armed liner SS Cap Trafalgar off Ilha da Trindade, South Atlantic. 14th September 1914.  By Ivan Berryman.
HMS Carmania sinking the German armed liner SS Cap Trafalgar off Ilha da Trindade, South Atlantic. 14th September 1914. By Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 15.00
Royal Flying Corps SE5As of 56 squadron engaged in air combat with flying circus Fokker Dr1s commanded by the great German ace Baron von Richthofen, France 1917.

Brief Encounter by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 125.00
 One of the few rules of aerial combat that were established in the First World War was to attack, where possible, with the sun behind you, thus using the element of surprise both to appear as if from nowhere and to blind your opponent to minimise retaliation. Just such a tactic has been successfully employed here as a DH.2 rakes the tail of Staffelfuhrer Hauptmann Rudolf Kleines Kasta 3 LFG Roland C.II as it returns from a patrol in the skies above northern France in 1916. Known affectionately as The Whale, the C.II was extensively streamlined and the positioning of the cockpits and wing cut-outs afforded both the pilot and observer unequalled views in all directions. Power was supplied by a 160hp Mercedes D.III engine and armament was a 7.92mm Spandau in front of the pilot and a 7.92mm Parabellum for the observer.

Out Of The Sun - LFG Roland C.II by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

Special Offer
Prints

<b>Published in 1901 by George Newnes Ltd, this is an original book plate from a large format naval book.  These may have some text from the book on the rear of the book plate, but this does not detract from the framed image.  Only a few of these original book plates are still available today, more than a century after they were first published.
HMS Kent Passing South Sand Lightship by Charles Dixon.
Save 5! - 75.00
At 0620 hours covered by a brief barrage from 1000 guns, the tanks of C and F Battalions in MkIV tanks advanced alongside the men of the British 12th Division against the impregnable German Hindenburg line at Cambrai.  Supported in the air by 4 RFC squadron flying ground attack missions, the general offensive had broken through 3 trench lines and penetrated 5 miles on a 6 mile front by lunchtime.  Although these gains were not exploited and later retaken by a German counter offensive, Cambrai showed the full potential of the tank on the battlefield.

Battle of Cambrai, France, 20th November 1917 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Lieutenant Leefe-Robinsons BE2C, converted to single-seater night-fighter configuration, destroying the German SL11 over Hertfordshire on the night of 2/3 September, 1916. Robinson attacked the SL11 from below, raking it with incendiary fire, before turning and diving past the airship for another attack. As he did so, the airship exploded into flames and crashed into a field near Cuffley, killing all sixteen crew. For this action, Leefe-Robinson was awarded the VC.

William Leefe-Robinson by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Save 10! - 48.00
 New Zealand's highest scoring ace, with 25 victories to his credit, proved himself to be an extraordinary and resourceful leader.  Whilst on a routine patrol in September 1918, Keith Logan 'Grid' Caldwell's 74 Sqn SE5a was involved in a mid-air collision with another SE5a, the impact breaking one of Caldwell's struts and destroying the aerodynamics of his aircraft, which promptly dropped 1,000 ft and went into a flat spin.  Incredibly, Caldwell climbed from the cockpit of his stricken machine and held the broken strut together with his left hand whilst keeping his right hand on the joystick, somehow steering his wayward fighter out of danger and over friendly territory.  With no hope of a safe landing, the Kiwi jumped clear of the SE5a just a second or so before it impacted with the ground. Astounded British soldiers in a nearby trench saw Caldwell stand, dust himself off and walk casually toward them.  He returned to his unit and continued flying until the end of the war.

The Tenacious Grid Caldwell by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Save 50! - 120.00
 Flying Sopwith Snipe E8102 on 27th October 1918, Major William Barker encountered a flight of fifteen Fokker D.VIIs and decided to take them on single handed. Having downed one enemy aircraft, Barker was wounded in his left thigh and momentarily fainted. Coming to, he found another D.VII ahead of him and immediately resumed the battle. Another bullet now tore into his right leg and another shattered his left elbow. Despite his terrible injuries, Barker shot down three D.VIIs and drove the others off before crash landing his bullet-riddled Snipe in friendly territory. He survived the crash and was awarded the VC for his gallantry on this epic flight.

Major William Barker VC, DSO - Nearly an Ace in a Day by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Anthony Herman Gerard Fokker was born in the Dutch East Indies in 1890. When his father retired the Fokker family returned to Holland, where Anthony attended school. He dropped out of college, and being deemed unfit for military service, worked at a number of odd jobs. Fokkers father persuaded his son to attend an automobile mechanics school in Germany, but Anthony was disappointed and convinced his father to enroll him in a school near Mainz which offered courses in aircraft construction and flying. This endeavor was not particularly successful, and Anthony decided to build his own flying machine. He found a partner in Oberlieutenant Von Daum, a fifty-year-old officer in the German military. The aircraft was completed in 1910, and Fokker flew it successfully on a number of flights. Von Daum, unfortunately, destroyed the machine on his first attempt at flying it. The two partners then teamed with a boat-builder to construct a second aircraft. In early 1912 Anthony had organized  Fokker Aviatik GmbH with money advanced from his father. Fokker won his first contract for military aircraft in July 1913. Fokker became interested in the design of the Moraine-Saulnier, which exhibited flying characteristics far superior to the early Fokker designs. The Fokker M.5 (Eindecker I) emerged from the reengineering of a damaged Moraine-Sualnier. With the outbreak of WW I, the German military ordered large numbers of this aircraft for use as a scout. These Fokker scouts were good machines and well-liked by the pilots that flew them. Early in 1915 the French equipped their scouts with forward firing machine guns, and German losses in aerial combat increased sharply. The French system was simplistic and utilized shields on the propeller to deflect soft copper shells. Anthony Fokkers company was the first to introduce a workable machine gun synchronizer which would allow steel bullets to be used. The German military ordered the new Fokker fighter in large numbers, and by late 1915 the tide had shifted dramatically in favor of the Germans. The British press coined the term Fokker Scourge to describe this new menace which was increasing casualties to unprecedented numbers. Oswald Boelcke, and Max Immelmann were two German pilot aces who became very popular. Immelmann is depicted in Stan Stokes painting executing the aerial maneuver which took his name. Immelman received the Blue Max (Pour le Merite) to add to his Iron Cross following his eighth victory on January 12, 1916. He would officially be credited with fifteen victories prior to his death in June of 1916. The Germans maintained that a defective gun synchronizer caused Immelmann to shoot off his own propeller.

The Fokker Scourge by Stan Stokes.
Save 15! - 25.00
  Emerging from a smokescreen SMS Baden surges ahead of her sister ship SMS Bayern to resume battle speed in these fleet manoeuvres in the Baltic, during 1917

The Kaisers Ship by Randall Wilson (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00
 Australian by birth and serving with the New Zealand army in the middle east at the outbreak of World War 1, Arthur Coningham joined the RFC in 1917 and was posted to 32 Squadron, flying DH.2s, as depicted here. It was in such a machine that Coningham scored the first of his 14 victories, sending down a German two seater over Ervillers. He survived the war and was made AOC Desert Air Force in 1941 before taking command of 2nd Tactical Air Force until the Second World War's end whereupon he became Air Marshal and was awarded a knighthood. He died in January 1948.

Major Arthur Coningham by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Save 5! - 75.00
 Having spotted smoke on the horizon, Vice-Admiral Sir David Beatty ordered that a floatplane be immediately launched from HMS Engadine to investigate. Without delay, Short 184 (serial No 8359) was airborne, but had to maintain a modest altitude due to the low cloud base. Flight Lieutenant Frederick Rutland (who would forevermore be known as Rutland of Jutland) and his observer G.S. Trewin, quickly spotted the German fleet, but found their radio transmissions to be jammed and, upon encountering engine problems, were forced to return to their tender where they were able to file their report. Sadly, an increasing swell made a further flight impossible and their report failed to be relayed to the British Fleet who continued their engagement with the Germans without the benefit of aerial reconnaissance.

Flight Lieutenant Rutland and Assistant Paymaster Trewin Locate the German Fleet at Jutland, 31st May, 1916 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
FEATURED WW1 ARTISTS

David Pentland

 


Ivan Berryman

 

NEW - Naval Art Postcards

Click for full list!

 

 

WW1 CENTENARY - GET FREE AVIATION AND MILITARY PRINTS!

Get these four stunning First World War aviation prints FREE when you purchase any of our special WW1 Centenary packs.  There are almost twenty different prints to choose from that have this very special offer - click the link below to see all of them!

SEE THE WW1 CENTENARY AVIATION PACKS WITH FOUR FREE PRINTS - CLICK HERE

 

 

Get these six classic First World War military art prints FREE when you purchase any of our special WW1 Centenary packs.  There are almost twenty different prints to choose from that have this very special offer - click the link below to see all of them!

SEE THE WW1 CENTENARY MILITARY PACKS WITH SIX FREE PRINTS - CLICK HERE

 

 

WW1 Aviation Art ] WW1 Naval Prints ] WW1 German naval ] Battle Of Jutland ] Coronel ] Cavalry Actions ] Great War Medals ] Gallipoli ] Meuse Argonne ] Battle of the Somme ] Battle of Gheluvelt ] Battle of Ypres ] Neuve Chapel ] Battle of Pozieres ] Battle of Le Cateau ] Tank Actions ] Battle of Mons ] Francilly-Selency ] First World War Artists ] Battle of Neary ] Fontaine Notre dame ] Persian campaign ] Military Uniforms ] Naval Art W Wylie ] Ferme Du Bois ] Battle of Aisne ] Zillebeke ] Antique Prints ] Military Awards ] Original Paintings ] Miniature Helmets ]

 

 

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:



Subscribe to our newsletterReturn to Front Page