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Dawn Patrol by Stan Stokes. (B)


Dawn Patrol by Stan Stokes. (B)

The fledgling air forces of WW I had no problem finding volunteers for a life promising adventure, romance, and a chance for immortality. The glamorized version of life as a WW I aviator, while not far off the mark for national heroes like Max Immelmann, Oswold Boelcke, Charles Nungesser, Manfred von Richtofen, Rene Fonck and Billy Bishop, was only a pipe dream for most pilots. Honors accrued only to those with large victory totals, and impressive wins, and as the War dragged on, the chivalrous adventure became more and more unglamorous. In fact the Allied command discouraged the use of parachutes - believing it the pilots duty to stay with his aircraft. Many pilots did not return home. The average expected lifespan of a new combat pilot during WW I was about 5 weeks. The French suffered a 77 percent loss ratio during the War, and the loss ratios for many British squadrons exceeded 90% early in the War. The Great War had started only about ten years after the Wright Brothers first flight and the aircraft flown at the beginning of the War were very fragile and not yet truly suitable for combat. Flying accidents and malfunctions took an enormous toll on both equipment and pilots. Despite the frailties of the aircraft and the relative inexperience of the military as to their use in combat roles, an Italian staff officer named Giulio Douhet, way back in 1909 had laid down the fundamental strategies of future air combat. In order to conquer the air, it is necessary to deprive the enemy of all means of flying, by striking them in the air, at his bases of operation, or at his production centers. There were many lesser known heroes of WW I, and one of the little known American aces of WW I was 1st Lt. William P. Erwin of the 1st Aero Squadron USAS. Erwin flew the Salmson 2A2 depicted in Stan Stokes painting. Erwin would attain eight aerial victories in this type of aircraft, making him the leading ace in this type of aircraft. Erwin was born in Amarillo, Texas, but grew up in Chicago. He volunteered for pilot training at the beginning of Americas entry into the War. He was accepted and ultimately was sent to France Flying with Lt. D.H. Dahringer, the first in a succession of observers, he downed his first German aircraft in September 1917. He shot down a Rumpler two-seater a couple of weeks later, and in early October during a dawn patrol he claimed his third victory. He bagged two German 2-seaters on a late afternoon mission to become an ace. On October 15 he bagged an unspecified German aircraft and three days later he downed a Fokker D VII. He completed his tally with the downing of another 2-seater on October 22. Erwin earned the Distinguished Service Cross and the French Croix de Guerre. He continued to be involved with aviation following the War. He entered the Dole Air Race from Oakland to Hawaii, but his aircraft was lost over the Pacific.
Item Code : STK0019BDawn Patrol by Stan Stokes. (B) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Limited edition of 100 giclee art prints.

Only two prints now available in this edition.
Size 21 inches x 14 inches (53cm x 36cm)none15 Off!Now : 130.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Dawn Patrol by Stan Stokes.STK0019
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 4750 prints. Print size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm) Supplied with signed and numbered certificate of authenticity.Artist : Stan Stokes10 Off!Now : 27.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 100 giclee canvas prints.

SOLD OUT.
Size 45 inches x 30 inches (114cm x 76cm)noneSOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 100 giclee canvas prints.

SOLD OUT.
Size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)noneSOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 100 giclee canvas prints.

SOLD OUT.
Size 27 inches x 18 inches (69cm x 46cm)noneSOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

Outward bound, Stirling III of 199 Squadron based at Lakenheath, Suffolk, heads out on another night of operations in August 1943.  EE953, Sqd letters EX - E of 100 group is piloted by F/L Tom Austin DFC who finished his tour by the end of October 1944, winning the DFC with his bomb aimer F/O Jack Lawrence.  Nicknamed the Queen of the Skies, the Stirling was the 1st four engined bomber to enter service with the RAF in 1941.  The cockpit stood a massive 22.5 feet from the ground and had an operational ceiling of only 12,000 feet, well within the range of the enemy AA guns.  By September 1944 other bombers were taking the brunt of the attack to the Germans and the Stirlings were used mainly for glider towing especially for D-day and Arnhem.

Tribute to the Crews of the Stirling by Graeme Lothian (GL)
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 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.

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Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
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 Von Richthofens Fokker DR 1 Triplane (Serial No 425/17) in company with his wingman in a Fokker D.VII over the fields of the Western Front early in April 1918, peeling off to attack a flight of three British fighters.
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 Savoia-Marchetti SM.79s, of the 281a Suadriglia based in Libya in 1940, begin their journey home after another successful mission against Allied shipping in the Mediterranean.  Nearest aircraft is 281-5, that of Capitano Carlo Emanuele Buscaglia.

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 The Italian Air Force's involvement in the Battle of Britain is one of the less documented facets of the conflict of 1940, but raids by aircraft of the Corpo Aereo Italiano (CAI) on mainland Britain were a reality in the closing stages, usually with little effect and almost always with high losses on the Italian side, due largely to obsolete aircraft and lack of pilot training.  Based at Ursel in Belgium, Fiat BR.20 bombers flew over 100 sorties, usually escorted by Fiat CR.42s, as illustrated here, the nearest aircraft being that of 18° <i>Gruppo's</i> Commanding Officer Maggiore Ferruccio Vosilla, wearing the white fuselage band and command pennant on the fuselage side.

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U-451 was sunk on 21st December 1941 near Tangiers, in position 35.55N, 06.08W, by depth charges from a British Swordfish aircraft (Sqdn. 812/A).  There was just one survivor from the crew of 45.

Swordfish Strike on U-451 by Jason Askew. (P)
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