Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985


Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details

Aircraft
Search
Ship
Search
Battle
Search
Artist
Search
SPECIAL OFFERS
Product Search         
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 4 hours, 60 minutes!
View our Special Offers
THIS ITEM IS CURRENTLY BETTER THAN HALF PRICE !
For a short time only, this item is included in our offer of items at less than half price.

Nery by Brian Palmer. (P)


Nery by Brian Palmer. (P)

Action at Nery, 1st September 1914. During the fighting retreat from Mons, battery L of the Royal horse artillery bivouacked by a small town of Nery. Their temporary halt was interrupted during the early morning cavalry patrol warning of the imminent arrival of a large German force of cavalry, infantry and artillery. almost immediately German shells began bursting amongst the battery, accompanied by a rifle and machine gun fire. 3 guns were knocked out before they could be brought into action and two more were disabled soon afterwards, while the British gunners sustained heavy casualties. the remaining no. 6 gun with a scratch crew managed to maintain a steady fire for some two hours inflicting heavy casualties on the Germans until reinforcements arrived, driving off the surviving German unties. Three Victoria crosses (one posthumously) and two French medaille militaire were awarded and two NCOs were commissioned after the action.
Item Code : DHM1237PNery by Brian Palmer. (P) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Brian Palmer.

Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Brian Palmer2000 Off!Now : 1400.00
Better Than
Half Price!


Quantity:
OWN AN ORIGINAL PAINTING!
This fantastic original painting is part of our original collection of over 600 paintings.
This collection is available at cost price or even below - so grab a bargain while it is available!
Please email us at cranstonorders@outlook.com or call on international (+44)1436 820269 or from UK on 01436 820269 and we will be happy to discuss this item with you.
View all our original paintings here
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Nery by Brian Palmer.DHM1237
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm) Artist : Brian Palmer75 Off!
Supplied with one or more  free art prints!
Now : 55.00
Better Than
Half Price!
VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Brian Palmer10 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 130.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Brian Palmer
on separate certificate
Half
Price!
Now : 250.00VIEW EDITION...
POSTCARDCollector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)none2.50VIEW EDITION...
SPECIAL
PROMOTION
Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

TWO PRINTS ONLY IN THIS SPECIAL NEWSLETTER PROMOTION.
Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Brian Palmer
B.O.G.O.F.
Now : 130.00VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

9th (Irish) Field Battery firing on the Run-in-shoot to Queen Beach. They were the first rounds fired at the Normandy Coast, D-Day 6th June, 1944. Queen Beach, one of the 4 sectors of Sword Beach, where most of the landings of D-Day were carried out. The Queen Beach sector which extended for 1.5km between Lion-sur-Mer and the western edge of Ouistretham. The attack was thus concentrated on a narrow one-brigade front. For once the DD tanks and other armour came in exactly on time and ahead of the infantry. The 8th brigade, with the 1st Battalion of the South Lancashire Regiment on the right and the 2nd East Yorkshire on the left.

Operation Overlord by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
Panoramic view of the battle fought between the French and the Austrian armies on 14th June 1800.

Battle of Marengo by Louis Lejeune.
Half Price! - 30.00
After capturing Haarlem, the Spanish troops of the Duke of Alva moved to take Alkmaar, 20 miles to the northwest of Amsterdam. Alvas natural son Don Frederic of Toledo again commanded the attack. With 16,000 men the Spaniard struck the city on August 21, 1573. He was beaten off by a stubborn defense carried out by only 2,000 soldiers and armed townspeople. Don Frederic then laid siege to the city. The Alkmaarites retaliated by opening the dikes and flooding the land. An inland Spanish fleet under the Comte Bossu (Jean de Henin-Lietard) sought to come up to help the besiegers. It was met in the Zuider Zee by a Dutch naval force under Admiral Dirkzoon. The Dutch destroyed the Spanish ships, capturing Bossu. On October 8 the Spanish had to abandon the siege. Alkmaar thus became the first city in the Netherlands to resist successfully the iron hand of Phillip II. It was also Alvas last battle against the Dutch; he was succeeded by Don Luis de Requesens.  (It is likely the artist has mixed up the name of the town of Alkmaar with the captured city of Haarlem)
The Surrender of the Town of Alkmaar by the Dutch by Robert Hillingford. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
<b>Ex display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

The Infantry Will Advance by Carl Rochling. (Y)
Half Price! - 30.00

 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - 30.00
A regiment of Cuirassiers stand awaiting orders during the Battle of Austerlitz during the Napoleonic war against Austria and Russia.
Austerlitz Before the Charge by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.
Half Price! - 40.00
Under the command of James Kempt and as part of the 8th Brigade (consisting of the 1/28th Reg 1/32nd Reg 79th Reg and the 1/95th regiment) the 28th Gloucester Regiment fought at Quatre Bras and at Waterloo.  The regiment distinguished itself during the battle and were mentioned in the dispatches of the Duke of Wellington.  The 28th Regiment continued to wear the old style stovepipe shako, distinguishing them from most British regiments that had adopted the new Belgic shako.  In this painting the 28th Gloucester are seen repulsing the French Cuirassiers while in a square.  During the Battle of Alexandria some 14 years earlier, the 28th Gloucester Regiment were given the unique honour of wearing a badge on both the front and rear of their head dress.  From 1751 to 1782 they were the 28th Regiment of Foot, and merged with the 61st (South Gloucestershire) regiment to form the Gloucestershire Regiment in 1881.

28th Gloucester Regiment at Waterloo by William Barnes Wollen.
Half Price! - 38.00
1995: Three 105mm Light Guns are coming into action on the roadside.  Towed by an AFV 432, the far gun has arrived first and is almost ready to fire.  The middle gun arrived next, and the nearest gun last.  Red pennants mark the position where each gun is to take up its position.  Due to the hard road surface, they were simply laid on the ground.  The towing vehicle could be either an AFV 432 or a Steyr, seen with the middle gun.  They can be parked near the gun, and the driver could well be in his seat, as shown.  Not all the men of the detachment are needed in order to bring the gun into action.  The 432's engine could be running, and smoke is blowing upward from the exhaust pipe.  It takes some time for the engine to switch off, and needs to run down.  At the far end of the position is the Command Vehicle (CV), a 432 which arrived at the position first.  Arriving last, and coming to park at the far end of the position, is a DROPS vehicle carrying ammunition.  As each gun comes into action the muzzle cover is removed.  The two boxes which contain the sight and the gunner's quadrant are laid on the ground.  The prism is also on the ground, yet to be set up.  The director party is out of sight in this view.  On the gun, the base of the sighting mechanism is visible, but the sight itself is not yet fitted.  The buff-coloured pad is the gun-aimer's forehead protector.  Thick, white arctic socks (with a thin red stripe near the top) were issued, and can be seen on one man.  One individual (a Bombardier) always wore his sleeves rolled up.  Into the hollow end of the handspike the rammer has been inserted.  Its conical end can be seen.  In the background can be seen the ski-slope, built for the 1984 Olympic Winter Games.

105mm Light Guns coming into action at Malopolje, Mount Igman, August 1995. 19th Regiment Royal Artillery. by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:



Subscribe to our newsletterReturn to Front Page