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Storm of Steel by Chris Collingwood.


Storm of Steel by Chris Collingwood.

Passchendaele 1917. Imperial German Infantry 6th Reserve Division 11th Battalion at the third battle of Ypres.
Item Code : DHM6073Storm of Steel by Chris Collingwood. - This Edition
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 160 prints.

Image size 26 inches x 18 inches (66cm x 46cm)Artist : Chris Collingwood145.00

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This Week's Half Price Art

GIFP2408GS.  Lancelot defeats Mador by J E Buckley.
Lancelot defeats Mador by J E Buckley. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
Bhurtpore, about a hundred miles South of Delhi, was a fortified city perched on a great mound. The walls of the fortress were built of mud, of immense thickness, and the round shot fired by artillery in those days simply buried themselves deeply in their sides. Following the murder of the rightful successor to the ruler of Bhurtpore, lawlessness and oppression prevailed in the region. The Governor General ordered the Bengal Army to restore order there.  One cavalry and two infantry divisions, with a powerful siege train of the Bengal Army marched towards the city. Then began the slow, methodical work of digging the parallels, emplacing the guns behind defensive parapets and bringing up and defending the massive quantity of ammunition that was required. In the rocky soil around Bhurtpore every European and Native soldier was employed in the hard work of digging these positions. The guns steadily pushed forward as new parallels were dug, until the breaching batteries were established no more than 250 yards from the fortress. On 18th January 1826 the final assault was made, and Bhurtpore was captured.  Gabions filled with earth protect the guns from enemy fire. Above these are laid fascines and sandbags. Bhurtpore's crumbling walls of dry mud, which the artillery has been bombarding night and day, can be glimpsed above the gun position. I have depicted an iron 24-pounder gun on its wooden platform. The piece of the gun would have been horizontal at this range. The NCO in charge of the gun is sighting it by looking along the piece. Two men with hand-spikes manhandle the bracket trail according to his instructions. This would have to be done each time the gun was fired. The solid round shot has been loaded and rammed home on its wooden sabot. After correctly laying the gun, the NCO will retire to the left rear and order the man holding the portfire to ignite the charge. A native lascar or Golundauze is replenishing the water bucket for the spongeman. In the background a bugler of the Bengal Artillery can be glimpsed in his red jacket. At far right is a soldier of HM's 59th Foot, which served in the trenches and took part in the assault.  In 1861 the Bengal Artillery was absorbed into the Royal Artillery.
3rd Company, 4th Battalion Bengal Artillery at the Siege of Bhurtpore, 1825-26. Now 57 (Bhurtpore) Locating Battery Royal Artillery (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
The recovery of LCpl Edwards Warrior, Gonji Vakuf, Bosnia, 13th January 1993.  On 13th January 1993 there was severe fighting in the town of Gornji Vakuf, when a column of armoured vehicles of B Company, 1st Battalion The 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment arrived.  Lance Corporal Edwards was the driver of a Warrior, call sign Two One.  His driver's hatch was open, and as he crossed the bridge over the river a sniper shot him.  His Warrior veered towards the left and came to a halt.  Inside the vehicle, the soldiers were unable to contact the driver.  An MRRV (Mechanized Repair and Recovery Vehicle) drove forward in front of the Warrior.  Under intense small arms fire, Corporal Bancroft emerged from his hatch and clambered across the roof of his vehicle, and down onto the ground to attach a towbar to the Warrior.  The Warrior was recovered, with the mortally wounded driver and the soldiers still inside it.  Shortly afterwards, when I was accompanying a patrol in two Warriors, I visited this spot.  We dismounted and I was able to sketch the buildings and the damaged railings of the bridge.  Lance Corporal Edwards was attached to The Cheshires from 1st Battalion The Royal Welch Fusiliers.  A memorial plaque was later erected to his memory beside the bridge.

1st Battalion Cheshire Regiment by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 On 6th June 1944, D-Day, the Canadian steamship HMCS Prince David  (F89), seen here in the background, released her compliment of landing craft embarking elements of Le Regiment de la Chaudiere, plus some Royal Marines, bound for Mike and Nan beaches.  Their mission was to clear mines and provide cover for the assault craft that were to follow.  By the close of the day, all of her landing craft had been lost to enemy action except one that was accidentally forced onto a semi-submerged obstacle by a friendly tank carrier.

The Drive to Juno by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 700.00

Battle of Crecy  26th August 1346. On 12th July Edward III landed in Normandy with his army and marching north plundered the countryside. King Philip VI assembled an army to stop Edward and tracked them across the Somme River. When Edward reached Crecy he stopped and ordered his army to take up defensive positions. King Philip surveyed the English positions and decided to postpone his attack until August 27th. However, the French vanguard pressed forward too far and so committed the entire army to the battle. The hired Genoese crossbowmen began the assault but came under severe attack from the English longbows and so fled to the rear. King Philip then ordered his cavalry to charge resulting in a huge loss of horse and man under the barrage of arrows which rained down on them. By the end of the night after several unsuccessful assaults the French army was reduced by a third and King John of Luxemburg was dead. Edward then turned towards Calais.

Battle of Crecy by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - 70.00
Richard Duke of Gloucester (later Richard III), after the Battle of Tewkesbury, 4th May 1471. Banners are of Richard Duke of Gloucesters White Boar and Sir John Stafford Of Mordaunts (created Earl of Wiltshire by Edward IV) coat of arms.

Richard III by Chris Collingwood (P)
Half Price! - 7000.00
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The Charge of the 19th Light Dragoons at Assaye by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Norman infantry regroup as their cavalry go forward to meet the Saxons.

The Battle of Hastings - The Norman Lines by Brian Palmer. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 

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