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The High Passes by David Pentland.


The High Passes by David Pentland.

The Carnic Alps, Northern Italy, 24th May 1915. Within the first days of declaring war against Austro-Hungary surprise attacks by Italian Alpini captured the weakly-defended Cima Frugnoni, the Pfannspitze and the Porze. Basically there were two means of penetrating the Austrian lines: either across the relatively low 1,360 m (4,462 ft) Plöcken Pass or via the 1,636 m (5,367 ft) Kreuzbergsattel pass. The Italians attacked both with such vehemence that the terrible losses made this one of the bloodiest battles in the Alpine war.
Item Code : DHM6234The High Passes by David Pentland. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 30 giclee prints.

Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : David Pentland95.00

Quantity:
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Other editions of this item : The High Passes by David Pentland. DHM6234
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 20 artist proofs. Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : David PentlandAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!120.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of up to 10 giclee canvas prints. Size 20 inches x 15 inches (51cm x 38cm)Artist : David Pentland
on separate certificate
70 Off!Now : 180.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original oil on canvas painting by David Pentland. Size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : David PentlandSOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

 On 27th November 1950, thousands of Chinese troops swarmed over the frozen Yalu river on the North Korean /Chinese border, cutting off US Marines in the Chosin Reservoir area. Over the next ten days the marines with air support from both the Navy and Marine Air Wings fought their way out of the trap to Hungnam and safety.

Frozen Chosin, Korea, December 1950 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 In 1275 BC there were two superpowers in the ancient near east, in the south the Egyptians and in the north the Hittites from Anatolia in modern day central Turkey.  A clash between these two powers was inevitable.  The Egyptian Pharaoh Rameses II marched an army north into Syria to confront the Hittites and their allies under King Muwatallis.  Reaching Kadesh Rameses camped under the walls of the city with his leading division, Amun, and awaited the arrival of the rest of his army.  Poor intelligence had led Rameses to believe the Hittites were far to the north, in fact they were only 2 - 3 miles away.  Muwatallis delivered a surprise attack against Rameses camp but the Egyptians managed to hold on until re-enforcements arrived.  Despite retreating from the field after a day long battle it was Rameses who claimed a victory.  The two armies never clashed again and eventually a peace treaty was signed between the Egyptians and the Hittites.

The Battle of Kadesh - circa 127 BC by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
21st July 1842: When bad feeling arose over trade relations between the Honourable East India Company and China, an expedition was mounted to re-establish trading facilities in certain Chinese ports. A force of infantry was accompanied by units of the Royal Artillery and Madras Artillery. An amphibious attack was made up-river towards Canton in 1840, and after first taking the forts which defended it, the city itself was eventually captured. After taking Amoy, the British force moved back to establish itself in Canton. Then, the entire British force sailed to capture Shanghai.  Proceeding up the river Yangtse Kiang, the fleet anchored abreast of the city of Chin-kiang-foo, at the foot of whose walls lay the grand canal. On 21st July 1842 all the troops were disembarked and took up their positions. Colonel Montgomerie, who commanded the artillery brigade, placed his guns in a strong position on a low hill commanding the Western gateway and walls. The infantry escaladed the North angle of the walls and after a sharp struggle the city was captured. Hostilities ended when the force reached Nanking.  For operations in the stifling heat and the swampy banks of Eastern rivers, the smaller and handier artillery equipments were preferred. As well as the smaller howitzers, five 6-pounder guns were also used. Field guns of the Madras Artillery had a distinctive flat, circular brass nave plate.  The Madras Artillery regulations describe the Undress uniforms and horse furniture of the officers. They and their men are wearing forage caps. Gunners and drivers with field batteries were armed with short swords. In marching order the Madras Artillery men were ordered to wear Undress jackets, woollen trousers and carry haversacks (containing provisions). As a gun is loaded, one of the detachment goes to fetch another cartridge from the limber in the rear. An officer of the 18th (The Royal Irish) Regiment, suffering (like many) from heat stroke, is aided by a soldier and a sepoy of the Madras Native Infantry.

The Madras Foot Artillery at the Assault on Chin-Kiang-Foo, 21st July 1842 by David Rowlands. (B)
Half Price! - 20.00
After a major victory at Salamanca (22 July 1812) Wellington occupied Madrid and then advanced to capture Burgos - unfortunately with insufficient siege equipment he was compelled to retire and forced to experience a harrowing retreat, it was, he said The worst scrape. However, when the campaigning season ended, Spain, south of the Tagus, was free of the French.

The Worst Scrape - Retreat from Burgos October/November 1812 by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

Depicting Lord Cardigan (centre figure) amongst the Russian guns with the 13th Light Dragoons and 17th Lancers, other regiments in the charge of the Light Brigade were, 11th Hussars, 4th Light Dragoons and the 8th Hussars during the Battle of Balaclava in the Crimean War.

Charge of the Light Brigade by Thomas Jones Barker (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 The 14th/20th Kings Hussars assault on Objective Copper South.

Battle of Al Haniyah, 26th February 1991 by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 In the predawn light the last Pz.Kpfw. VI Tiger II (Kingtigers) of 2nd Company 506th Heavy Tank Battalion, drive south across the Arnhem bridge to prepare for the upcoming counter-attack to retake Elst and the Nymegen road bridge.

Finale at Arnhem, Holland, 24th September 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
DHM328GS. Bonaparte au Pont DArcole by Gros.

Bonaparte au Pont DArcole by Antoine-Jean Gros (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00

 

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