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Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
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THIS ITEM IS INCLUDED IN OUR BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE OFFER !
Choose any two prints in this special offer and the lower priced item is half price. (Any free bonus prints already supplied with an item are separate and will also be included !)
Hundreds of items across our websites are included in this offer!

The Lonely Sky by Gerald Coulson.


The Lonely Sky by Gerald Coulson.

A single Royal Flying Corps SE5 patrols the clouds above the trenches of the Western Front.
Item Code : GC0780The Lonely Sky by Gerald Coulson. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 600 prints.

Issued in 1982. Last 3 prints available of this sold out edition.
Image size 30 inches x 25 inches (76cm x 64cm)Artist : Gerald Coulson£20 Off!Now : £180.00

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This Week's Half Price Art

 The formation of six New Zealand squadrons within the RAF in the early part of WW2 acknowledged the contribution and commitment of the Commonwealth to the campaign against the Nazi invasion of Europe.  Among these was 489 Sqn, based at Dallachy in Scotland, whose Beaufighter Mk Xs flew missions against Axis shipping in the North Sea as well as other missions along the Scandinavian coast.  Here, two 489 Sqn Beaufighters run up their engines prior to a sortie in the Winter of 1943/44.

Kiwis at Dallachy - Tribute to No.489 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Supplies being flown in for the US Implementation Force (IFOR), near Zupanja, Croatia.

Hercules Supply Drop by Tim Fisher (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Typhoon IBs of No.181 Squadron attack a German supply vessel off the coast of northern France during the run up to D-Day in 1944 using cannon and 60il rockets. This unique aircrafts amazing speed at low level and awesome fire-power proved formidable and, after a shaky start to its service career, proved itself beyond all doubt to be an essential tool in the softening-up operations against German defences prior to allied invasion in June 1944.

Typhoon Season by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Half Price! - £105.00
Up to 1942 Bomber Command operations were beset by many problems. The means they had to accurately pinpoint the target and assault it were totally lacking, in fact their Commander in Chief, Air Marshall Arthur Harris later wrote : It was glaringly obvious that the average crew in average weather could not find their way to the target.  Between February and August 1942 an effort was made to rectify this through the development of a specialised target finding and target marking force, which became known as the Pathfinders. Activated on August 15 this new group was formed under the leadership of their AOC Air Commodore Don Bennett, himself a very experienced pre war pilot with exceptional navigational skills. The aircrews of No. 8 (PFF) Group were tasked with marking out the designated targets but the formation of this group was initially opposed by Harris. He felt that the ranks of his Main Force could be weakened if a high number of experienced and highly skilled crews were taken by this specialist unit, leading to a lessening of skills within the other bomber groups. He agreed however for an alternative scheme whereby complete units were assigned to the Pathfinder Force and the stage was then set for what was to become the Main Offensive of Bomber Command.  The first four Squadrons - Nos. 7 (Stirlings) 35 (Halifax) 83 (Lancaster) and 156 (Wellingtons) - were based at a clutch of airfields between Cambridge and Huntingdon. In the absence of any specialist Target Markers the crews were initially forced to operate using standard flares and the early raids produced variable results, with cloud cover often proving the main obstacle in accurate marking. However during the winter of 1942 the introduction of the ground guided marking system, OBOE, marked a quantum leap in accurate target marking and by mid 1943 Pathfinder techniques had been developed for all forms of weather conditions, including nights when complete overcast existed.Pathfinder crews used a combination of personal skill and technical equipment such as H2S to locate their targets. Often flying against overwhelming odds and in appalling conditions they transformed the performance of a bomber force that in 1941 was dropping almost half its bombs on open countryside. This third and final painting in Gerald Coulsons Tribute to Bomber Command depicts Lancaster Bombers of No.8 (PFF) Group returning late after a gruelling operation over Berlin. It is Christmas 1943 and the winter landscape reflects the early morning sunrise as the weary crews approach the safety of their Cambridgeshire base.

Winter Ops by Gerald Coulson.
Half Price! - £180.00

 From 1915 to 1917, there existed a very real threat of a bombing campaign on mainland Britain as the giant German airships drifted silently and menacingly across the English Channel and the North Sea to deliver their deadly cargo on the towns and cities of the east coast. Countermeasures were soon put into action as powerful searchlights picked out the Zeppelins for the anti-aircraft batteries and RFC pilots to pour their unrelenting fire into the raiders, sometimes with little effect, sometimes with catastrophic results. Here, 2nd Lieutenant Brandons BE.2 climbs for position, its exhaust pipes aglow in the dark, whilst flak bursts all around the massive bulk of the L.33 as she passes over the east end of London on the night of 23 / 24th September 1916.

A Zeppelin over London by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 2 Mk7 Lynx of 664/661 sqn. AAc, providing Top Cover for an UN PROFOR Convoy in Bosnia Herzegovina.

Op Grapple by John Wynne Hopkins.
Half Price! - £50.00
FAR936. The Peacekeepers by Adrian Rigby.

The Peacekeepers by Adrian Rigby.
Half Price! - £25.00
  A Vought A-7 Corsair of VA-146 makes its  final approach to the sprawling deck of the USS America, (CVA-66) as she skirts Vietnamese waters in company with a little Rock-class missile / command cruiser. The A-7 became the Navys prime weapon toward the end of the war, playing a vital role in the anti-radiation Linebacker Raids.

USS America by Ivan Berryman (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 

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