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First World War Art

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CCP65P. Observer / Gunner, Royal Flying Corps 1917 by Chris Collingwood.

Observer / Gunner, Royal Flying Corps 1917 by Chris Collingwood. (P)
- £500.00
 Renault FT 17 baby tanks of the recently formed US 304th tank brigade commanded by the young Lt. Col George S. Patton Jnr. are employed for the first time during the allied assault on the St Mihiel Salient. Leading the 344th battalion in person Patton and his tanks help the infantry divisions push the enemy back to the Hindenberg line in only 4 days.

Baptism of Fire - St Mihiel Salient, 12th - 15th September 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
- £2200.00
 Set against a spectacular Alpine backdrop, a pair of Aviatik D.1s of Flik 17/D are shown on patrol in March 1918, the nearest aircraft being that of Zugsfuhrer F Korty-Lalitz. When first entering service, the D.1 was praised by its pilots for possessing an excellent climb rate and outstanding performance, but its woeful lack of synchronised armament and poor forward visibility compromised the D.1s ability to meet its enemies on equal terms, these examples being armed only with a single over-wing Schwarzlose M7/16 or M16 machine gun.

F Korty-Lalitz, Aviatik D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £2800.00
 Perhaps the greatest exponent of Fokker's Eindecker series of aircraft, Max Immelmann is credited with 15 aerial victories and was the first fighter pilot ever to win the coveted Pour le Mérite. He was killed on 18th June 1916 during combat with British FE.2B fighters of 25 Sqn.

The First Ace - Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £2000.00
 New Zealand's highest scoring ace, with 25 victories to his credit, proved himself to be an extraordinary and resourceful leader.  Whilst on a routine patrol in September 1918, Keith Logan 'Grid' Caldwell's 74 Sqn SE5a was involved in a mid-air collision with another SE5a, the impact breaking one of Caldwell's struts and destroying the aerodynamics of his aircraft, which promptly dropped 1,000 ft and went into a flat spin.  Incredibly, Caldwell climbed from the cockpit of his stricken machine and held the broken strut together with his left hand whilst keeping his right hand on the joystick, somehow steering his wayward fighter out of danger and over friendly territory.  With no hope of a safe landing, the Kiwi jumped clear of the SE5a just a second or so before it impacted with the ground. Astounded British soldiers in a nearby trench saw Caldwell stand, dust himself off and walk casually toward them.  He returned to his unit and continued flying until the end of the war.

The Tenacious Grid Caldwell by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 German forces begin their assault on the Nimy Bridge, 23rd August 1914.  The bridge was defended by the 4th Battalion The Royal Fusiliers.

German Assault on the Nimy Bridge, Mons, 23rd August 1914 by Jason Askew. (P)
- £2300.00
  Emerging from a smokescreen SMS Baden surges ahead of her sister ship SMS Bayern to resume battle speed in these fleet manoeuvres in the Baltic, during 1917

The Kaisers Ship by Randall Wilson (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00
Action at Nery, 1st September 1914. During the fighting retreat from Mons, battery L of the Royal horse artillery bivouacked by a small town of Nery. Their temporary halt was interrupted during the early morning cavalry patrol warning of the imminent arrival of a large German force of cavalry, infantry and artillery. almost immediately German shells began bursting amongst the battery, accompanied by a rifle and machine gun fire. 3 guns were knocked out before they could be brought into action and two more were disabled soon afterwards, while the British gunners sustained heavy casualties. the remaining no. 6 gun with a scratch crew managed to maintain a steady fire for some two hours inflicting heavy casualties on the Germans until reinforcements arrived, driving off the surviving German unties. Three Victoria crosses (one posthumously) and two French medaille militaire were awarded and two NCOs were commissioned after the action.

Nery by Brian Palmer. (P)
Save £1000! - £2400.00
 The Sopwith Camel was with the mainstay of the Royal Flying Corps.  It is shown here downing an Albatros over the Western Front.

Sopwith Camel by Anthony Saunders. (P)
Save £2000! - £4800.00
FEATURED WW1 ARTISTS

Chris Collingwood

 


Randall Wilson

 


Nicolas Trudgian

Welcome to the website dedicated to the Historical Military Art Prints of the First World War published by The Military Art Company Cranston Fine Arts. By the worlds leading artists covering many of the great battles of the Great War.

We have bought together the largest range of Military, naval and Aviation art work of the First World War available. At great prices, and many special offers and 2 print pack offers. The more you buy the more you save, many of these superb art prints are only available direct form Cranston Fine Arts or our websites.

 

LATEST WW1 AVIATION ART RELEASES

 Born of Croatian parents in Sarajevo in 1893, Friedrich Navratil served under the Austro Hungarian flag throughout his considerable military career, becoming an outstanding pilot with Flik 3J on the Italian Front. He is depicted here chasing down a Hanriot of 72A Squadriglia da Caccia over Val del Concei in August 1918 to claim his third of ten victories. Navratil's distictive Albatross D.III (Oef) 253.06 was easily identifiable by his personalised 'Pierced Heart' emblem and is unusual in sporting the then new Balkenkeuz cross, untypical of Austro-Hungarian aircraft in WW1.

Oblt Friedrich Navratil by Ivan Berryman.
 Arguably the best known of all World War 1 fighter aces, Mannfred von Richthofen, the 'Red Baron', is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final livery following the introduction of the <i>Balkenkreuze</i>, early in 1918. Contrary to popular belief, this was the only Triplane flown by the <i>Rittmeister</i> that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Greatest of Them All - Manfred von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman.
 Perhaps the greatest exponent of Fokker's Eindecker series of aircraft, Max Immelmann is credited with 15 aerial victories and was the first fighter pilot ever to win the coveted Pour le Mérite. He was killed on 18th June 1916 during combat with British FE.2B fighters of 25 Sqn.

The First Ace - Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman.
 The great Werner Voss is depicted in his Fokker F1 103/17 of Jasta 10 in the Summer of 1917. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary airmanship, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down and killed by Lieutenant Rhys Davids' SE5 on the very day that he was due to go on leave. The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss' machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine and his aircraft was not fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.

Into the Sun - Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman.

A single Royal Flying Corps SE5 patrols the clouds above the trenches of the Western Front.

The Lonely Sky by Gerald Coulson.
The practice of shooting down observation balloons was as dangerous as it was essential and none was more successful than Belgium's Adjutant Willy Coppens of the 9eme Escadrille, Aviation Militaire Belge who downed an astonishing 35 balloons, as well as two aircraft during his flying career in WW1.  He is shown here in Hanriot HD.1 No24 destroying a German Drachen balloon in the closing minutes of the day near Houthulst.

Last Kill of the Day by Ivan Berryman.
Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 Godwin von Brumowski's 13th victory against an Italian Macchi seaplane over Grado, in northern Italy.

Lucky 13 by Ivan Berryman.

LATEST WW1 MILITARY ART RELEASES

Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 The Carnic Alps, Northern Italy, 24th May 1915.  Within the first days of declaring war against Austro-Hungary surprise attacks by Italian Alpini captured the weakly-defended Cima Frugnoni, the Pfannspitze and the Porze.  Basically there were two means of penetrating the Austrian lines: either across the relatively low 1,360 m (4,462 ft) Plöcken Pass or via the 1,636 m (5,367 ft) Kreuzbergsattel pass. The Italians attacked both with such vehemence that the terrible losses made this one of the bloodiest battles in the Alpine war.

The High Passes by David Pentland.
 Passchendaele 1917.  Imperial German Infantry 6th Reserve Division 11th Battalion at the third battle of Ypres.

Storm of Steel by Chris Collingwood.
 Imperial German Infantry March 1915.

Letter From Home - 1915 by Chris Collingwood.

 The 1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers going over the top on July 1st 1916, Battle of the Somme.

The Burning Moment - 1916- The Somme by Chris Collingwood.
 Somewhere in Flanders, 1917.

Trench Pals by Chris Collingwood.
 Assault in the vicinity of Thiepval by the Ulster division-1st July 1916.  The 11th Royal Irish Rifles, moving forward from the A line of trenches, and moving forward to attack the B line of trenches, the attacking infantry are preceded by Bombers - seen carryng grenades in green canvas buckets - who are engaged in throwing grenades in anticipation of the rifle company assault on the enemy trenches; an activity barely changed since the days of Marlborough.  The rifle companies are armed with the Lee Enfield SMLE - a superb rifle, though expensive to make.  The advance is made with bayonets fixed, as trench clearing involved numerous hand to hand confrontations and bayonet fights.  The rifle companies are supported by  two Lewis gun teams per company.  Note that visible in the painting is a man carrying an orange painted steel marker, painted on one side only. The markers are to to indicate to British artillery observers as to the most forward positions taken by the British advance.  Naturally, one does not present the orange side to the enemy!

The Great Folly of 1916 by Jason Askew.
 The 2nd Australian Brigade were brought up to reinforce the British attempt to force the Turkish positions at Achi-baba. this action developed into the second Battle of Krithia.

2nd Australian Brigade fighting in Gully Ravine by Jason Askew.

LATEST WW1 NAVAL ART RELEASES


Untergang der Kanonenbootes 'Jtis' an der chinesischen Kuste.

Kreuzer der Auflarungsgruppe vor Helgoland.

Auf der Kommandobrucke eines Linienschiffes by W Stower.

An Deck eines Torpedobootes.


Jm Gefechtsmars eines Kreuzers by S Stower.

Rekruten Exerzieren mit Handwaffen an Deck eines Panzerschiffes by S Stower.

Hochsee Torpedobootsdivision den Kieler Hafen verlassend.

A Night Attack - Torpedo Boats at Work by Charles Dixon.

This Week's Half Price World War One Offers

 Credited with no fewer than 80 victories, Manfred Von Richthofen, The Red Baron, became legendary, not least for the 17 kills scored whilst flying the diminutive Fokker DR1 Triplane.  Contrary to popular belief, however, only one of his aircraft is known to have been painted all red. Serial no. 477/17 is shown here dicing with an SE5.
Seeing Red by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Synonymous with both World Wars, the young Hermann Goring scored his first victory on 16th November 1915, shooting down a Maurice Farman over Tahure. A year later, he was injured in combat, but managed to land his bullet-riddled aircraft near a field hospital. Goring steadily increased his score to an eventual 22 victories and is shown here on patrol in his characteristic all-white Fokker D.VII.

Oberleutnant Hermann Goring by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes.  In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284.

Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 On the morning of 21st April 1917, coastal airship No C.17 was on a routine patrol captained by Sub Lieutenant  E G O Jackson, when sometime around 8.00am, she was attacked by German seaplanes and shot down. Such was their vulnerability that these huge battlebags were an easy target for marauding enemy scouts, their single Lewis guns achieving little by way of defence. The Hansa Brandenburg W.12, on the other hand, was a nimble and useful aircraft that the Germans put to good use in the coastal defence role.

Hansa Brandenburg W.12 - Attack on the C.17 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 Linienschiffsleutnant Gottfried Freiherr von Banfield was one of the top scoring aces of the Austro-Hungarian Empire with 9 confirmed and 11 unconfirmed victories to his credit and was awarded the Empires highest order, the Knights Cross of the Order of Maria Theresa for his achievements.  In February 1916 he was put in command of the naval air station at Trieste, a post that he held until the end of the war.  He is shown here with his observer, Seekadett Heribert Strobl Edler von Ravensberg, having just claimed his first victory, an Italian observation balloon near the mouth of the Isonzo River on 27th June 1915, flying his Lohner Type T, L.47.

Gottfried von Banfield by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Albert Ball was the first Royal Flying Corps pilot to score a hat-trick (3 kills on a single mission) and, in the course of his career, scored another two on his way to his outstanding 44 victories.

Albert Ball VC by Darren Baker. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Max Immelmanns Fokker E.1(E13/15) shooting down a Vickers Gunbus during the Summer of 1915. Immelmann is characteristically already scouring the sky above for his next victim.

Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 With a wingspan of 42.2 metres, the mighty Zeppelin Staaken series of bombers were truly awesome, living up to their name Riesenflugzeug - Giant Aircraft. Unusually for this period, the crew compartment of the R VI was fully enclosed and the bomb load was carried internally. The four engines were mounted in tandem pairs, two pushing and two pulling, which eliminated the need for complex gearing, and the flight engineers sat in cockpits in the engine nacelles. This example is shown limping home, its rear port engine stopped and smoking, escorted by its Little Friend, an Albatros D.V.  The painting shows the Staaken bomber is quite badly shot up. There are bullet holes all over the port wings, tailplane and rudder, as well as the engine trailing smoke from a small oil fire in the nacelle, which the engineer is keeping an eye on.

Kleiner Freund - Zeppelin Staaken R.VI by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

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 A Bristol Fighter attempted to intercept a single giant Zeppelin Staaken R.IV bomber as it approached the heart of the capital.  The Brisfit failed to stop the raider and R-39, with Hauptmann Richard Bentivegni, (commander of 501 Squadron) aboard, flew on unhindered to its target.

Shadow Over London, England, 28th January 1918 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Fokker E II of Leutnant Kurt Freiherr von Crailsheim of FFA 53 is shown in formation with his wingman in a similar aircraft. Von Crailsheims aircraft bears his personalised markings of yellow, black and white diagonal bars on the fuselage, thought to represent his Military Merit Medal combined with the black and white of Prussia. The cross on the fuselage sides was applied in an unusually forward position. FFA 53 was based at Monthois late in 1915 and it was from this location that von Crailsheim made his final flight in this aircraft on 30th December.

Kurt von Crailsheim by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The highest scoring Sopwith Camel ace of World War 1, Donald MacLaren was born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1893. Joining the Royal Flying Corps in 1917 as a trainee pilot, it was only the following March that he claimed his first victory, a Hannover C-Type whilst posted to 46 Squadron. His kill rate was quite formidable for, in this the final year of the war, he was to claim no fewer than 54 confirmed victories. Indeed, in the period from 15th September to 2nd October, he claimed eight Fokker D.VIIs - a remarkable feat against Germanys most potent fighter. He is pictured here attacking a D.VII in Camel F2137 U of 46 Sqn. MacLaren survived the war and died in 1989.

Donald MacLaren by Ivan Berryman.
Save £30! - £80.00
 Von Richthofens Fokker DR 1 Triplane (Serial No 425/17) in company with his wingman in a Fokker D.VII over the fields of the Western Front early in April 1918, peeling off to attack a flight of three British fighters.
In For The Kill by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Save £30! - £180.00
 The Royal Aircraft Factory RE.8 (Reconnaissance Experimental 8), or Harry Tate as its crews affectionately called it, was used throughout the Great War to good effect, but was something of an anachronism when pitted against the more modern machines of the Jastas. However, Lieutenants Rothes Pithey and Rhodes scored a credible 10 victories together, sending down three Pfalz D.IIIs on a single mission on 7th June 1918 flying F6097.

Lieutenant Croye Rothes Pithey and Lieutenant Hervey Rhodes, RE.8 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
The village of Courcellette dominated the Somme battlefield, and it was the Canadian Corps who were given the task of taking the strongpoint.  They were however aided by a new weapon, six tanks of No.1 Section, C Company, Heavy Tank Battalion.  The Mark Is were commanded by Captain A. M. Inglis in C5 Creme de Menthe and supported the 31st (Alberta) Battalion in the successful assault in and around the villages Sugar Factory.

Assault on Courcellette, The Somme, 15th September 1916 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The exploits of the partnership of McKeever and Powell in their 11 Squadron Bristol F.2B made them perhaps the most celebrated of all the Bristol Fighter crews, McKeever himself becoming the highest scoring exponent of this classic type with a closing tally of 31 victories. Powell was to secure a further 19 kills before both were withdrawn from front line service to Home Establishment in January 1918. Whilst on a lone patrol above enemy lines in November 1917, their aircraft (A7288) was attacked by two German two-seaters and seven Albatross scouts, four of which were sent to the ground through a combination of superb airmanship and outstanding gunnery. The remaining German aircraft continued to give chase until the F.2B was down to less than 20ft above the British trenches, at which point the Germans broke off their attack and fled.

Captain Andrew McKeever and 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Powell by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 By British standards, the colour schemes of many Felixstowe flying boats were unusually garish during the closing months of World War 1, but there was a simple logic to this choice of livery: A downed aircraft would be easily visible in a dark sea and even when in combat with its German counterparts, it could be easily identified, both by friendly aircraft and by ships below. F.3 N4258 sported this red and white chequerboard pattern, whilst others wore stripes or zig-zags, this example being based at Felixstowe Naval Air Station in the late Summer of 1918.

Felixstowe F.3 by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Save £5! - £70.00
 The Red Baron in one of his Albatross scouts instead of the Fokker DR.1 Triplane with which he is more often associated. History records that no fewer than 56 of his victims fell to the guns of a succession of Albatros scouts, so I have depicted him here flying D.III Nr.2253/17 in which he claimed (among others) victory number 52, his last in this aircraft before taking some long-overdue leave.  He went on to become the highest scoring ace of World War 1 with 80 confirmed victories to his credit before his untimely death in April 1918.

Red Danger by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Save £10! - £145.00
FEATURED WW1 ARTISTS

David Pentland

 


Ivan Berryman

 

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WW1 CENTENARY - GET FREE AVIATION AND MILITARY PRINTS!

Get these four stunning First World War aviation prints FREE when you purchase any of our special WW1 Centenary packs.  There are almost twenty different prints to choose from that have this very special offer - click the link below to see all of them!

SEE THE WW1 CENTENARY AVIATION PACKS WITH FOUR FREE PRINTS - CLICK HERE

 

 

Get these six classic First World War military art prints FREE when you purchase any of our special WW1 Centenary packs.  There are almost twenty different prints to choose from that have this very special offer - click the link below to see all of them!

SEE THE WW1 CENTENARY MILITARY PACKS WITH SIX FREE PRINTS - CLICK HERE

 

 


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